Sunday, February 8, 2009

Odds and Ends


I have taken the BWOF plunge. The fabric I am using is the one at left. It is a quite heavy linen with a really nice hand. About 7-8 years ago I discharged this BLACK fabric. As you can see it shades from purple thru magenta, and then even pink. The scissors are on it to give you a sense of the scale. It is about 3 yards by 54 inches. I love this fabric.
Finally I have found the right pattern, I believe. It is in the February issue of BWOF, pattern number *115. I chose that one because this is my first experience with Burda. It is the "sewing course" pattern that is offered each month. It has a shaded pattern to trace, much easier to see. It also has more extensive directions than other patterns in the magazine because of the "sewing course" designation. I figured I needed this extra help the first time around. I also read and reread my directions as Tany and Summerset suggested.

So far my only mistake has been the following: BWOF gives you a pattern layout for your fabric and the required pattern pieces. It also gives you dimensions for pieces that don't have pattern pieces. Got that? I traced everything, added my seam allowances and cut out. When I got to the "turn ups" ( what they call cuffs) I cut the piece out per the spec'd dimensions. I forgot add the SAs. As I had this piece half cut out, reality set in. Luckily I had plenty of fabric for cutting out the pieces WITH the SAs.

Today I started putting things together. I have been sewing a bit, and the sequence on this pattern made no sense to me. It has you make the entire jacket and at the very end put on the pockets and flaps. My usual MO is to make the details, aka pockets and flaps, first, before construction and then install them into the flat fabric, certainly not at the tail end of the project. So that is what I did today and I am glad I did. I have read the directions over and over, as many have suggested this where problems occur. Well, sorry, the sequence to be followed just did not fit my experience so I " did it my way" . Right now I have the fronts and backs ready to be put together with the pockets and flaps all installed. Tomorrow we will work on the sleeves and cuffs. Keep ya posted. I really like the styles offered in the magazine and can see myself doing a lot more.

***********************************************************************************
On my recent post on the olive green linen blouse, a couple of you had questions.

Cissie asked if I did French seams on this blouse. I did but did not do them on the armholes. In the armholes I stitch first at 2.0 then did another line of stitching an 1/8th of an inch away with a 1.5 stitch length. . I then trimmed the seam close to the second stitching and zigzagged the edge all the way around. It made a strong narrow seam. With all that I had to ease in on the sleeve I did not want to compound things with a French seam on a tight curve. I was able to get a nice french seam on the princess curves, however. Again a lot of steaming helped that along. I also made them as narrow as I could.

Design Dreamer asked which stitch I used and thought I used a Bernina. I sew with a Pfaff, which I love. The stitch I use, a Parisian stitch, looks like a ladder with one side of the ladder missing. It also looks like a blanket stitch. The difference with a blanket stitch is that the Parisian stitch goes in and out of the holes three times. That and the use of a wing needle helps make the holes large. That is the goal of hemstitching. This is also facilitated by the use of embroidery, aka fine or size 60 or 80 , thread. The fine thread hides and lets the lacey holes be the star. In this case however, I wanted a match with my thread and fabric and embroidery thread was not available in the color. I did sample and liked the bulkiness of the regular size thread. My holes were not as obvious but the bulkier stitching looked appropriate so I was happy.

***********************************************************************************
My sewing has taken a back seat the past few days as our daughter, her DH, and three little ones were here visiting. We had a great time visiting the Ice Castle at Saranac Lake and watching the fireworks when it was lit off. They also got to go skiing at Whiteface and we got to watch the twins while they did. It was all great fun. Here are a couple of pics of the little ones. The twins love to get into boxes and both climbed into this tote.

10 comments:

  1. The feb issue is a great one, and you'll never make that mistake again, trust me! As for sequence, you've got years of experience, so don't doubt yourself. Good luck, and watch out, BWOF is addictive!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Burda always puts things together contrary to the way I learned especially keeping it flat as long as possible. I read the instructions several times to make sure I understand the construction, but mostly I do it my way. I write in red the sas that needs to be added so that I don't forget. Looking forward to seeing your finished jacket

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm so glad you're taking the BWOF plunge. I still feel like a newbie having only made 3 BWOF patterns so far...there's still a lot to learn.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Whew! Thanks for the encouragement!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm in total agreement. Screw BWOF directions and do it your own way! There is a Yahoo Group called BurdaEnglish if you want extra BWOF support.

    ReplyDelete
  6. That fabric discharged beautifully! You never know what you'll by discharging - sometimes those colors, sometimes vibrant oranges and yellows.

    You will notice that there are a few things BWOF does differently or in a different order. It really doesn't matter what pattern I'm using, I usually do things my own way. I think it makes better sense to construct pockets and those sorts of details in the flat, too.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Yes, I rarely follow BWOF's instructions. I read through them, look at the pattern pieces and then go through the process in my head. You're an experienced sewer so trust your own judgment :))
    And I really like that there's no SA on the pattern, so much easier to test it out and then add the SA you prefer.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Your support is very appreciated. Thanks all.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Bunny, how did you do your color discharge on the linen. I just love the way it turned out. I think I could probably duplicate it with some accidental bleach, but I don't want holes in my fabric either.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'm wondering also how you discharge "dye".
    I'm sure I've seen it somewhere, but can't recall anymore.

    ReplyDelete

Engaging commentary: