Monday, June 7, 2010

Greist Goodies!

I had a wonderful time visiting the grandchildren. They were funny, delightful, bright, and as all grandmas know, perfectly behaved ;). I did have the chance to briefly focus on a tiny bit of sewing related fun that I also couldn't wait to blog about.

If you've read this month's Threads magazine there is an intriguing article about vintage machine attachments and how they could work on our current machines. Who knew? I sure didn't. What I read I sure felt I wanted and needed but alas would search out these gems when I got back. Then I was sitting in my daughter's kitchen,

yup, sitting and noticing the treadle machine I gave her to fill up her empty apartment when she was in dental school. She has always liked it as a piece of furniture and now it sits in the kitchen of her first home acting as the family message center. Eureka! Didn't I have a ton of attachments in one of those drawers? We both dug thru and found what I think is quite a haul. Above is what I think is a tucker. I have the pics in Threads to compare and are also two great websites, TheSewBox.com and SewFancy.com with lots more info. I think I am really going to enjoy piecing together this puzzle. I have lots of odd pieces but before I go ramming anything into the attachments that doesn't belong I will do a lot more research. If this is indeed the tucker, yippee. Lots of possibilities here.

Everything in my little haul appears to be made by Greist. Above you can see the name engraved on this binder.
These are three hemmer feet, looking like tiny rolled hem to 1/4 inch.
In the group were two binders. I can't figure out the difference other than one has a lot of vents on the cone.
 This looks like the edge stitcher I left drool on in the magazine page. You can see from all of the slots all of the different sides and sizes you can slide in and stitch together. There is great info in Threads on this one.
Above are some of the odd little pieces left over that either go into some of the above attachments or make up another one or even work on their own. I am pretty sure the tweezer looking affair goes on the tucker. Isn't this a great puzzle to figure out? I am excited and on my quest.

I can't leave without showing a little something from my  trip. The dogwoods were in full bloom and glory in North Andover and while stopped at a red light I just grabbed my camera and took this pic. We don't have dogwoods up here....Bunny

18 comments:

  1. This is so awesome. I am so excited for you.

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  2. It is called a ruffler by most. it can be set to stitch & pleat every stitch, every 6 or 12 stitches. Depending on the number of stitcher per inch set on your machine, it will vary slightly. Happy Stitching.
    Beckie in Brentwood, TN

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  3. What great finds! And don't you just love the recent isue of Threads? I have a lot of attachments in my treadle also, and must get them out and see what I can do with them. I have a foot fetish, and have most of the attachments available for two of m Berninas.

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  4. I have a ruffler. This tucker is a bit different and you can't see the 4 inch long piece that I need to put in. It is not a ratcheting type mechanism. It can make up to one inch tucks. There is one screw to set up the size of the tucks and another to set up the spacing in between. You could set up a one inch tuck with a 1/4 inch space in between if that is what you want. It also makes a crease on your fabric to let you know where to fold the next tuck. It does look like a ruffler in its current state but if you read the Threads article, which I found really interesting, you will see the differences. I should be able to use these on my Pfaff and certainly on my featherweight with the proper adaptor. I think I may even have one or two in my stash of feet.

    Gwen, I love your term "foot fetish". Spot on!

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  5. I have to laugh about this. Right after the Threads issue came my dh came home from a garage sale with vintage sewing machine attachments! A rather gorgeous and involved tucker and some feet. He then remembered that his mother still has her old Singer with her in Asheville and that it has lots of attachments. I don't think that she's taken it out since she moved there 30 years ago! She invited me to look through her attachments when we come down next month. I hope that she has that edge attachment!

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  6. This opens up a whole new world of possibilities. I need another life of time to get to all this!

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  7. Those look like tucker parts to me, too -- I have a tucker and it is fun to use.
    But what I like best are those Greist hemmers! They are wonderful. You probably know exactly how to use them, but just in case, the author of that Threads article has a great post on roll hemmers on her blog.
    Looking forward to seeing how you put your new old tools to use.

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    1. Hope you see this comment on a very old post. I don't suppose you have a link to the blogger you're referring to? I'm trying to learn how to use my Greist hemmer foot and its not treating me well. Thanks!

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    2. http://www.ismacs.net/white/manuals.html

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  8. Lucky you!! I have a New Home 1915 treadle that I use just for those attachments, since I don't want to spend $100's on the new versions. Check out this site, where she has a whole load of tutorials about old attachments. http://susanscloches.blogspot.com/

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  9. But it dawns on me that your attachments (from the pics) are top clamps. That sort of attachment is old! Doesn't fit today's machines, and hard to find when you need one! I know of no adapters, either. Altho the folks at treadleon.net may know more than me.

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    1. Rosie makes a good point re top clamping feet. I have a 1909 White Family Rotary treadle machine with a full complement of attachments and it uses top clamp feet. White made a few early Kenmores that could use these feet, too, I think. I haven't heard of any adapters for these, either.

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  10. This is all great imput. Rosie, I really appreciate your knowledge. It's all a big puzzle that I hope to play with. I still have the machine and all it needs is a belt so that is always an option. It has taken up resident's in DD's home as a piece of furniture so not sure if I'll get to play with it. I will keep all posted as to whether these will work or not. Wouldn't it be great to have a snap on foot like those hemmers?...Bunny

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  11. Neat! Those old attachments are the best - it's a fun puzzle to get them all working, if you have the time.

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  12. "foot fetish" LOL How appropriate!

    I would have sworn that it was a ruffler, as it looks just like mine. I'll be interested in seeing what you come up with, Bunny.

    The green dress is coming along nicely. Your attention to detail always inspires me. I so wished we lived closer so that I could sit & learn beside you.

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  13. That "Threads" article sounds great, I'll have to look for it. Your tucker looks a LOT like my ruffler also. I bought it eons ago, and of course it doesn't work on my Bernina(s).
    Look for an excellent tutorial for how to use a ruffler (and I would guess that most of it would be applicable to your tucker) on youcanmakethis.com by the "Scientific Seamstress". It's free!

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  14. Hi, the two binders are different. The one with the single slot will only take one size of binding, while the multi-slotted binder will take a range, or even two at a time. I recently learned to use my binder and it is fabulous. The single-slotted binder should take 1/2" bias tape (double or single-fold doesn't matter). Cut the tape to a point, put it in the slot, and pull through with a pin. The trick is keeping the fabric to be bound all the way to the right inside the binder. You can also use bias strips cut to 15/16", don't put them in the slot but pull them through so they fold.

    I love my binder, hope you enjoy yours.

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  15. There are some youtube videos that show how to use most of those attachments.

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