Tuesday, August 3, 2010

Simp 2357, Construction

The Pendleton Bag, Simplicity 2357 is very close to complete. Love that tag that came with the yardage. I sewed it on the outside of the bag. My company is a day late and I am a day closer to completing it. There are a few things that need to be pointed out about this pattern. It is very easy. Despite the fact that I am using wool and fusible fleece it is easier to sew than most bucket type bags I have put to dear Pfaff. There are just no awkward turns and angles here. I am going to point out a few of the changes I did and recommend to anyone using this pattern.Some are because of my own decisions, others are because of the dumbing down of the pattern. First, the design calls for a strip of points to be sewn into the bias edges of the bag opening. The combo of the wool and fusible fleece was just too much for the pattern design to handle. Way back in my former quilting life I learned how to edge a quilt with "prairie points". Its really simple and here is how to do it:

First I cut a five inch square. It was five inches because that was the width of my ruler and it just seemed simpler to work with that width. The triangle is folded on the diagonal and given a good press. Then it is folded in half again and pressed well. I used my clapper thruought this project. Then the folded triangles are placed inside of each other along the bias edge and basted in.
The biggest problem I see with this pattern, and I do think it is a big one, is that there is no direction to stabilized the  bias edge. This bag will be pulled open a lot . Just handling it in sewing caused my lining to stretch quite a bit. So I would at the least, stay stitch the edge, but better yet, use some twill tape or selvedge to stay the edge.
Another shortcoming in the pattern directions is the lack of direction to understitch the edges, those bias edges again. I understitched them as far as I could. I also ditch stitched by hand with a back stitch,  connecting the side seams between the  lining and the wool. Without the ditch stitching and the understitching I can really see this bag bagging out, separating the lining, and becoming pretty sloppy looking pretty fast. Another recommendation would be to stitch a second line of stitching next to the first when attaching the handle to the bag, just for strength. This bag looks like it could carry a lot and I would hate to see that handle separate.

Below you can see the inside of the bag. It is pinned here and there and therefore looks a little lumpy. All that is left is to connect the other side and finish the bottom edge with a binding.I love the Kasha lining, very luxurious and perfect for this fabric.....Bunny

11 comments:

  1. This bag looks intriguing. I've been looking around your site for the Badgley Mischka jacket. Did you finish it?

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  2. The BM jacket is waiting for its organdy for the under collar. Today I decided that I will use the same linen for the undercollar as the hours of summer are marching on. I am still waiting for my order from Stauffer's in Pennsylvania. As soon as this bag is done it will be completion time for the BM jacket. Thanks for asking.

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  3. My local Joann's has had this bag on display, and I love the design. I wholeheartedly agree on the importance of stabilizing a bias edge and understitching. Makes me think that pattern instruction writers may not be sewers, since those 2 steps are vital to a great final product!

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  4. I'm new to your blog Bunny and loving it. The plaid is just gorgeous. My boss has a home in Long Lake so who knows, I may meet you when I'm up in the Adirondacks one of these days.

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  5. OMG - this looks so cool. What a fabulous job of detailling this!!!

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  6. This is going to be beautiful !

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  7. Thanks for the info on "prarie points". I like that they nest inside one another-that looks very nice with the plaid.

    This will be a beautiful bag,

    marec

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  8. I love how this is turning out - very classy sort of bag. I agree that some patterns lack the finer details of stabilizing, etc. which would produce a superior product. Thanks for reminding us to stabilize that bias!

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  9. This bag made in silk is on display for sale in my local art center--for $100!

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  10. I just cut out this fabric as directed--all the same direction, and I cannot figure out how to put it together. The notches don't match up! My fabric is single-direction, and printed only on one side. Any suggestions?

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  11. Never mind. I see what I did wrong. :::sob:::

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