Sunday, November 25, 2012

I'ved moved on and Why.......

I gave it my best effort but at this time of year, I just don't have the patience. This is my first "quitter" in years. While I think I have improved the bodice that ballooning out of the bodice at CF is ridiculous. WTF is that? While I may beat out Andrea Mitchell for the most narrow shoulders in America, I have never had a CF balloon out like this. My decision at this point: This is way too poorly drafted to waste any more of my valuable time. Oh, I could fix it,

by adding a couple darts......

but I haven't even begun to work out the sleeves or collar yet. I will write this one off and move on. I am needing me some handwork, something fussy, that I know I can do pretty well. I am going to work my way through the back room mess to see if I can rustle up some grey silk or something for the next Koos bag. Wouldn't a bit of contemporary smocking be great on that? Hopefully that won't be another great idea that goes South. I'm moving on. Eat my dust, Marcy Tilton, Vogue 8676........Bunny

Thank you, everyone, for all your very great input.  You gave some great info, advice, and empathy, always so appreciated....Bunny

24 comments:

  1. Bunny so sorry that happened to you, but I've truly felt the same way on occasion as you've probably read in some of my blog posts. You are ONE really great sewist.

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  2. No regrets, Bunny! The most freeing sensation is when we sewists finally realize that the darn thing is not going to work, and the est thing we can do is toss it OUT - out of sight, out of the house! There are so many other wonderful thigns to do with our sewing time - don't you all agree?

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  3. Yes,why the heck live with the frustration to achieve something you are not happy with.
    Ever onward!
    Terry

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  4. Sorry it didn't work out for you.

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  5. I think you've shown remarkable fortitude and persistence. I would have moved on before now.

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  6. I think you've made a sensible decision. Sewing is supposed to be enjoyable! And there are more appealing patterns out there than any of us could sew in a lifetime. So, why waist time with something so unpromising?

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  7. Oh Bunny, how frustrating. Patterns shouldn't be that difficult for a seasoned sewist. I'm sure you'll find something else that isn't so difficult that you'll love even more. Sometimes, we just have to cut our losses.

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  8. Bunny, Good for you for knowing when to call it a day. I am in awe of your ability to redraft and alter a pattern. It totally overwhelms me. Give me straight little bodies that I only have to worry about the crotch length. That is the extent of my redrafting abilities.

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  9. You are right, time to quit! Your experience with this is just proof of why a muslin is so important. I would hate to have cut into some fabulous fabric and then make it a wadder!

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    1. I so agree, Eileen. I perish to think that I would have cut into that beautiful fabric with such a horrid outcome. Once again, muslin making is the way to go in my opinion. I just don't have the time or money to waste. I always amazed at those who say it takes so much time and they just don't have that time. Are you kidding me. If I had made this, lined, interlined it and then it looked like crap, is that not more time wasted than what I did the past couple days? Muslin making saves time, money, and sanity.

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  10. Good for you to know when to not go any further! I had the same thing recently when trying to muslin and fit a cardigan pattern. Not one but two patterns did not make the cut! For a simple cardigan for gosh sake! Both patterns hit the trash so fast it would make your head spin.

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  11. oh Bunny what a shame, just a little annoying that you vested so much time into the project, but as others have mentioned just as well you didn't cut directly into the final fabric.

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  12. Dear Bunny,

    It's so annoying that the pattern didn't work for you, and with all that preliminary work you did! But, that's why we do it, right? I learned a lot from your process, if that makes you feel any better about sharing your trials and tribulations. And, if you ever want to get rid of the paper pattern for this jacket, I'd love to give it a go!

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  13. I feel your pain, Bunny! And you are the most persistent sewer I know! Maybe if you get it out of sight for a bit you might be strong enough to tackle it again. But my feeling is that it's time to move on. There are too many great patterns out there to spend this much time making do. I have personally never been able to use Marcy's patterns as our body types are obviously totally different. The only one I tried made me look like Omar the Tentmaker!
    Good luck on your next project. It is reassuring to know that even the best have bad moments!

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    1. Thanks, Cissie. I have spent the afternoon getting started on some smocking. It's nearly done, at least the smocking part. I am REALLY enjoying it.

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  14. It's not quitting, just another notch of experience.

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  15. (Kenny Rogers:) "You've got to know when to hold 'em, and know when to fold 'em..." And you surely do, Bunny. Is there anything in particular you learned in this project, Bunny? Other than this one didn't work for you? I've had a selfish motive in following your posts about this jacket -- I've had that pattern on my list for Joann's next Vogue patterns sale. I'll be deleting it momentarily. I have spent way more time and effort altering patterns that never ended up fitting me, and I used to think it was all my fault and lack of skills. I've since learned that while I still have a lot to learn, patterns aren't always drafted well. I hope you're enjoying your handwork while you contemplate your next project. Thanks, as always, and this time for sharing a pattern flop.

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    1. That was almost my title to this post, Sandra! If I learned anything here it is to always make muslins, always. I have made garments with two or three muslins before starting but they were always headed in the right direction. This time nothing worked.

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    2. I didn't learn so much as I was reenforced in my belief that muslins are a very worth while effort.

      I hope no one decided to not do this pattern based on my frustrations. I have a unique body shape, as we most do, and this could work well for many shapes, just not mine. So give it a whirl with a muslin and see what happens.

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  16. Sorry that this pattern made you cry Uncle! I think you and me and Andrea Mitchell must be sisters in shoulder narrowness. Sometimes I start with a six in the chest and it is still too wide! Marcy Tilton is a wonderful designer, but she doesn't draft for a sub-13" shoulder to shoulder measurement, that's for darn sure.

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  17. Its so much better to quit before you cut into the good stuff! I made two muslins of a pattern for my leather jacket that I chucked, and I chucked it after I paid to Have Kenneth King alter it at a fit clinic. I not only decided that I didn't like the pattern but, like yours there were some serious issues with it. There are some badly drafted patterns out there and at least you aren't a beginner who thinks it's her fault when something doesn't work out. Better luck with your next pattern.

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  18. Good for you for making the decision to abandon this one...for me that's one of the hardest calls to make.

    I'll be watching with interest how you address the narrow shoulders. This has always been a big problem for me and I'm never sure of what to do. Being able to see how you work this out at times will be a very valuable lesson for me!

    Linda S.

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