Saturday, June 29, 2013

The 3-D Sheer top a la Cynthia Rowley

 
With this project I need to figure out sheer hems on the  bottom edge and sleeves and also what to do with the neckline edge. The pattern has the neckline faced. A full facing of georgette would have been very distracting on this top so I needed to figure out something else.  I immediately thought of Kenneth King's Tiny Hem tute which you can find in the sidebar of tutes on the right. But Professor King has also recently taught a method of using netting to make hems in 4 ply silks that really intrigued me. While I used netting for one of the samples, it was not the King method. I sampled two techniques. On the top is a facing made with skin colored netting. On the bottom is the KK tiny hem. For the neckline I decided on the net facing. You may see a tiny gridwork in the georgette. That is not the netting. The netting does not show. Since KK's hem has two turns of stitching it was a bit more rigid than the netting method. I wanted a softer edge for the neckline so decided on the net facing. At this point I should change my words. It is actually skin colored tulle from the local chain. 

The first thing I did was carefully iron the tulle and then cut out the facing pieces. They looked identical but aren't so it was necessary to label them with some Frog Tape. To do the seams I simply overlapped the shoulder seam lines on these pieces and stitched across. Stitching a regular seam and pressing it open and having that bulk just seemed a bit more trouble with no gain, so I overlapped them.

I found it easiest to pin the tulle to the top while it sat on the dress form. Then I carefully lifted it off and went to the machine. This was all done while the shoulder seams were stitched but the side seams were still open and unstitched. The neckline was sewn with a 1.5 stitch length and trimmed back to an 1/8th of an inch.
 
The georgette SA was pressed toward the tulle and then folded to the wrong side and pressed. I then stitched the edge to secured down the netting as you can see in the sample I made above. I used a 2.0 stitch length for the topstitching. This gave a really soft finish to the edge. The tulle is ditch stitched by hand to the shoulder seams. It needs no more security than that. 
 You can see the front and back neckline here all completed. 

What is left to do is French seam the sides and sleeves and do the hems. I think I will use KK's method for that so it can be floaty with not tulle attached. .....So close to done!


17 comments:

  1. Ingenious way of finishing off the neck! The blouse looks wonderful!

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  2. Lovely. This is going to be a beautiful top.

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  3. Your blouse is looking lovely. Can't wait to see it finished. Tulle is a clever way to face the neck. Did you finish the free edge of the facing?

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    1. No, not at all. It is cut the size of the regular facing. I could cut it back but I think the length helps it stay put.

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  4. Wow, Never Thought To Use Tulle For Facing.. Thanks For Sharing! I Do Wonder Though It It Might.Get Scratchy On The Neckline/ Chest With The Tulle TherE On the Inside?

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    1. I've tried it on and it's not scratchy at all. The bigger holed, stiffer netting would be, however. This is actually quite a soft treatment and I would definitely do it again.

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    2. Thank You! :) The Blouse Is Really Lovely Bunny.. Look Forward To See the wholeT Outfit Together... :)

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  5. Very delicate work Bunny. You got it so nice and even too.

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  6. BRAVO!! Another issue creatively solved...and beautifully so. I know I was astounded at how soft some of the tulle can be. I always thought it was scratchy, too, but the new stuff is amazingly comfortable against skin. That's the stuff they are using to add a peek-a-boo ruffle at the hemlines of skirts. Not itchy at all!

    This is going to be such a lovely outfit when completed, Bunny! I can't wait to see the finished garments on you.

    fondly,
    Rett

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  7. What a beautiful finish, Bunny!

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  8. This may just be a case of absolutely perfect timing for me. I've been trying to figure out how to finish the neckline of a sheer top. I've got a question about my top that you may just be able to help me with.
    I'm working on Simplicty 1886, view E. With a couple of changes. No epaulets and I'm thinking that I should not doing it with a neckband. Instead I'd add the neckband to the front and back pattern pieces and cut them as two pieces rather than four. I'm doing this because I have a print fabric and I think it will look too busy with that join in the print. Wish I could add a photo to show you the print. I will move the ruffle right up to the new neckline. Now I'm thinking that using the tulle to finish the neck edge will work better than using a bias strip. A facing shows through to the outside and muddles the print. I'm using a very drapey sheer fabric for this top. Do you think the neckline will hold the ruffle up well enough? I've considered adding a clear elastic into whatever seam finish I do, my thinking being that it would help to hold the shape.
    I'd love to hear your opinions on my plans.

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    1. I like the idea of the elastic to hold the shape. Using the tulle will add no structure to your collar and it needs some. The topstitching involved in this tulle technique is what really keeps it all lying flat and in place. I am thinking without and edge finish/topstitching you won't have enough heft to hold up that ruffle. You'd me amazed at how they can pull that type of neckline right down. I've made a couple of tops on that idea and both times had to go back and redo because the neckling would pull down and not lay nicely and flat. I really think you need a bit more heft to whatever you decide to back the collar band with. I would also recommend some topstitching unless you think that would look totally out of whack. Good luck.

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    2. Thanks for the advice, Bunny. I'm now thinking that maybe a stiff(ish) organza type of fabric that I've got will be better for the facing. I hadn't even thought of topstitching. That seems like a good idea. I think that I'll try to do it so that the ruffle isn't topstitched though. At least, I hope I can manage to do that as I think it'll look better. I'll try out the clear elastic as well.
      Thanks again for your help.

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  9. what an interesting technique, mentally filing away...thanks!

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  11. What yummy pictures you have posted! Just seeing that sweet finish and the pretty embellishment is a treat. I look forward to seeing this project finished!

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  12. Love the tulle facing idea! Thanks for posting.

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