Sunday, January 24, 2016

vogue 9162, Some serious petite-ing!

 Work has begun on a new white shirt. I really liked this design by Katherine Brenne for Vogue, 9162. I like the tailored hi-lo hem as the higher front gives more leg length for me and the back covers my bum. Something about those curved hi-lo hems just doesn't appeal to me, however.  As I often advise. I took a close look at the pattern photo. Look with me here. The mandarin type collar is very deep, something that may be out of proportion to my petiteness.  The same goes for the pocket. These are intentionally large details but I think they still are not the right size for someone five feet tall and not too wide. The armscye seam is barely above the elbow.  Then there was the issue of width. I know this is supposed to be a wide bodice but I just wasn't feeling sure about it all. .  Time to flat pattern measure!

This top is 63 inches wide in the extra small size, sorry, just way to much for me. It was clear this pattern would require some major "petite-ing" to work on my frame. 


When I sew I always start with the smaller details. I took one quarter inch off every edge all around the pocket. That meant that the facing wouldn't fit. I had a brain fog moment or maybe just over thought, but something told me not to do the same with the pocket facing. Yikes, would the edges, the curve, not fit if I did?  Rather than spend time with this math moment, I cut back the vertical edges the same 1/4 inch and folded out the remaining 1/4 inch across the facing, perpendicular to the grain. It works. 

Next was dealing with that deep collar. 

Again, I folded out a quarter inch across the center of the collar, perpendicular to the grain.  Once that was made permanent by fusing a strip of leftover interfacing to the back, it was time to cut. 


In my wild enthusiasm here, I took a pic of me truing the seam for the largest size but you get the idea. The edge was trued. The seam allowance attaching to the neckline was not altered in any way.  Now for that amplified bodice! 

Nowhere on the pattern is offered finished measurements. Really, Vogue? Is it assumed that this is so stinkin' big that it doesn't matter? Well, it does matter. I am making the extra small. It is for a 29 1/2 inch bust.  I haven't seen that measurement since I was prepubescent, way pre pubie. I went ahead and measured the width. There are no pleats in the back. The bodice width at the waistline and hem is 63 (yikes!) inches and that is for the XS!. I do think I can let a bit of that go.

Four inches were taken out of the back bodice, two on each side. Then two inches were taken out of the bodice left and right, two different pattern pieces, so a minus of 8 inches total. This leaves a bodice width of 55 inches. I will live with that as this is a BIG shirt and the bodice should be wide. But when the bodice is wider than I am tall, well that's a problem. Once the width was folded out vertically the shoulder seams needed to be trued as shown in the pic above.

When all is said and done, will this swamp me? Will it look totally out of proportion? Will the ninth planet remain hidden behind the sun? I don't know the answers but we will find out soon enough, at least on the first two questions! Talk to Neil Degrasse about the third question.

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I found this little number in the clearance area at Joanns. Imagine, a bound buttonhole tool! I haven't read the directions yet but am anxious to give it a try. Has anyone ever used one of these?...Bunny

24 comments:

  1. Colette has a tutorial: https://blog.colettehq.com/tutorials/how-to-use-the-dritz-bound-buttonhole-tool

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    1. Thanks so much. That's a great tutorial and now I totally get it. I only wish I could pin it on my Pinterest technique board but pinning this appears to be blocked by Collette.

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    2. I made several suits in the late 60's, young and fearless as I was and truly confident that Vogue Patterns would lead the way. Well, I also took a couple of classes at Michigan State when I was in school. I used this gadget all the time. The buttonholes were great!

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    3. Oh, I still have it, and the welt pocket tool.

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  2. I used these bound buttonhole tools years ago. That was the only way I could make bound buttonholes then as I was a new sewer. Thank you for all your thoughts on the shirt. I,too, have that pattern in my sights. I did not pull it from the envelope yet but you have given me a lot to think about thank you

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    1. One thing I almost messed up: there is an upper collar and a separate under collar, something you don't often see on shirts. I cut the upper collar thinking that was it. HTHs.

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  3. Wow - that shirt is huge! I look forward to seeing the petite-ed shirt on you.

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    1. I think it is so funny that it is wider than I am tall. Fingers crossed it all works out in the end. BTW, my fabric is a white linen a touch heavier than a handkerchief linen. I have used it before for shirts.

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  4. Good luck! It would be nice if Vogue could offer the finished measurements instead of you having to figure them out. I will be looking forward to seeing the finished product. The white linen will make a great shirt for the humid summers (assuming that's what you have; I'm in Colorado and the humidity rarely gets above 50% - ever).

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  5. Holy Mother of enormous shirts, I am a size 26+ and I would have a little ease in that pattern! I find roomy garments far harder to work out than fitted ones - you just don't know what they are going to look like until you get them to a fitting state. But I think your "pre-call" on downsizing those oversized elements is super sensible.

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  6. Good call on downsizing the shirt. I agree that it would have overwhelmed your figure. I have a similar tool for welt pockets; the buttonhole one is probably a smaller version. It works great.

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  7. Bunny, I share your nickname AND your exact size! I would love to make this shirt, too, so thanks for being the petite pioneer. Have you made any length adjustments yet (thinking about those side vents)?

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    1. Quite a coincidence! I am actually keeping the length the same. The design is a big block and I decided to work out the hem toward the end. The back seems to fall right about the crease of my a-s cheeks, where I like it.

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  8. Wouldn't it make sense to fit the body first, and then to adjust the collar and pocket?

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    1. I know from experience to cut down details for my petite frame. I also look very closely at patterns. That collar is all on the model so it was definitely shortened for my personal preference. Other than removing vast amounts of width, no other adjustments will be made. The pattern is an extra small and those usually fit me spot on in the neckline and shoulders. I also still have a bit of fudge room if need be. I did shorten the sleeves, which I don't believe I mentioned in the post.

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    2. Meant to say the collar was TALL on the model.

      For some years now I have been using "unit construction" when I sew. I do all the small details first, then the bigger sections, then I put it all together. I believe it was Edna Bishop who taught this method. Someone correct me if I am wrong. I actually find it more fun to get to those small details first and do it without thinking now. So adjusting the smaller pieces first, if they need it, is just my habit.

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  9. I own the buttonholer tool, never used it, but have made bound buttonholes. Maybe I'll give it a shot after you do! :)

    Ahh, you are so awesome to tackle that. I would totally stuff it back in the envelope and find something else. Can't wait to see it. It looks like it could be a superbly comfortable top.

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  10. The bound buttonhole make is a help! They used to make a similar tool for welt pockets that is super. They can be found on eBay - just search sewing aids

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  11. Well it looks good on the model, if anyone can emulate it that would be you.

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  12. I am your height and size and can't imagine making an oversize blouse, in the first place, never mind one that is wider than I am tall!! I would just toss the pattern and find another that fits closer to my size. But my skills are not yours!

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  13. I've had my bound buttonhole tool since I was 17...a long time!!! You are going to love it.

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  14. Great adjustments on the shirt. I really like Brenne's designs, and think it's worth altering them if needed. Like your shirt, my V9135 jacket was really really big, and at 5'7", I sewed the XS! Looking forward to your shirt, I've been giving this pattern some serious thought.

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  15. Hi Bunny,
    I have posted a utube video to your fb page on the buttonhole tool. I have to admit that it has been on my Amazon wish list for some time.
    If you have come across Ann Vidovic's blog, Did you really sew that, then may I recommend her tutorial on how she does her bound buttonholes. I wrote to her after seeing her buttonholes and she kindly did a full stage by stage piece about her preferred method. I have to say, researching all the different methods rather made my head spin. I tried her way and it worked very well. However, I am still keen to try out the dritz tool at some stage.

    Can't wait to see your review on it as I know you will give us all perfect hints and tips for using it.

    Love the white shirt by the way and it will be great to hear more as you progress with it. We all know it will be excellent.

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  16. I, too, use unit construction. I find it fun to make all the fussy parts then sewing them together makes the finish see so much faster! Your white blouse will be lovely. Karen

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