Sunday, January 29, 2017

The Lucy Fur backpack continues


It took me most of the day to get everything fused for the backpack. There were all sorts of straps, flaps and the fur pieces.  How do you fuse fur? You don't! What I did was first remove the seam allowances on the interfacing pieces. I cut a piece of quilting cotton the same size as the fur and fused the interfacing to that. Then this fused interfacing/cotton combo was stitched to the fur pieces with a 1/4 inch seam. I found binder clips really helpful with sewing this to the fur pieces.


This is also my lining fabric, a quilting cotton,  but I had extra so that is what I used to fuse the peltex to for this piece.  All of the fur pieces had their seam allowances "shaved". That was pretty easy and I just held the fur taut with one hand and slipped the point of my shears about a 1/4 inch into it and cut a bit at a time. It really went fast and now the seams will be easier to sew.  "Reduce bulk whenever possible." Thank you, Roberta Carr.

Below we have a perfect example of why we stabilize and do test stitching before starting a project The stitches on the left, so nasty, were just stitched on two layers of the faux suede. The top right stitches have stabilizer and you can see how nice and smooth they are.


It's also a good idea to try your stitches with the interfacing that will actually  be used. I know the flap will be topstitched and have a layer of fused Peltex, really thick, hard stuff. I decided on a 3.5 stitch length and a "triple stitch" for the topstitching needed. Here's an example. The stitches on the right are just a plain straight stitch. The others are "triple stitch".


This is the same "triple stitch" that some sewists use to stitch knits. No, no, and more no. Why? It's overkill AND have you ever tried to rip a triple stitch out a knit? I guarantee you will throw out the garment first. So keep your triple stitch for topstitching which it does beautifully and use a simple zigzag or other option for your knits. Rant for the day!

I have a big wallpaper removal project going on at home and have been handling it one day each weekend and the other day for my sewing. It keeps my sanity that way. So this bag may take a bit. longer than I hope but I have a plan to get it done (and the wallpaper, which I've decided I hate),  One thing about this project, and it is a good thing, is that there is a huge amount of fusing, good because the end product is superior. This backpack takes 3 1/2 yards of woven SF101 interfacing! That is because the bag is all interfaced as well as the lining. An interfaced lining really makes a difference, IMO, and you find the better bag Indie patterns specify that. The Big Four never do. I've sewn quite a few Big Four bags and have never seen the linings interfaced. So far all my experiences with Indie Bag patterns have been really positive. Keep in mind I have only made Swoon and Emmaline bags. I do hope to make a Blue Calla bag in the future as well. I really think those three are the top of the heap.

I think that now that the fusing is complete the actual bag will go together quite quickly. Fingers crossed for a completion next weekend! In the meantime, this is what came out of the seam allowances on the fur.....Bunny

9 comments:

  1. Very helpful comments, Bunny! And nice to know I am not the only one who feels that way about the triple stitch. :)

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  2. Who on earth started this urban legend? You're not alone, BaMa.

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  3. OH...I don't miss that fur flying, LOL! Good seeing your progress!

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  4. Thanks for the tips about interfacing a and construction. You are so right about testing before using a stitch or technique. How many times would experimenting beforehand have prevented ripping and redoing.

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  5. I have a little battery operated beard trimmer that would probably work great for trimming fur out of seam allowances. I really got it to use as a seam ripper, it would work well for that triple stitch or lightning stitch on knits - as long as you aren't so frustrated that you pull the fabric into the teeth. I never used triple stitch on knits, but did use lightning stitch, but have since reformed my ways and now use a verrry narrow zig-zag, if I don't want to use the serger.

    Who started that legend? I suspect perhaps either sewing machine manufacturers (look! we have this magic stitch for knits! buy our machine!) or knit fabric manufacturers (look! machines have this magic stitch for knits! buy our fabrics!)

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    1. I think you are right on the urban legend, Gail.

      We have a hair cutter and I will occasionally cut my husband's hair with it. I had the great idea that it would work for this project on the seam allowances. It ended up being a fail. The fur was just too thick and long and it just wouldn't cut it. Cuts my husband's just fine but he only wishes he had that much "fur" on his precious head. ;)

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  6. I forgot a question about interfacing the fur - would it work to use a spray adhesive on the fabric back and interfacing? Or are there just too many ways that could go wrong? The first of which I can think of is how to keep it from getting spray on what shouldn't get spray.

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    1. It could with a non fusible but with the very heavy Peltex I really don't think it would be enough. There is Peltex in the back section that is against the body and I also added it on my own to the flap. I wanted a bit more substance there as well. For the flap I will just slip the Peltex into the "pillowcase" after it's put together and topstitch it in.

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  7. That trash can... it looks like you sacrificed an animal to the sewing gods. :)

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