Thursday, January 2, 2014

Interfacing Butterick 5960

A couple of days ago I began interfacing my coat according to directions. I owned the proper amount of hair canvas and thank heavens, as it is quite an expensive product. My philosophy is to  put into the structure parts that are equal to the quality of the fashion fabric so with my cashmere, hair canvas was a necessity. I cut and got ready to hand baste the product to the collar/facing section which goes around the neck and full length the front of the coat. 

Then I read Katherine Tilton's tip, "baste lightweight wool batting...". I didn't have wool batting and think that should have been spec'd in the fabric requirements if that is what the proper execution of this pattern needs. What to do?

 Here is the section with the hair canvas ready to baste. All along I had been thinking of putting a stay in the top of the garment, front and back, to help maintain and fill out the fabric. I even thought that I would use some flannel to do that so I'm am not that off base. I just needed to change my plan a bit.
Enter the Howling Wolves heavy cotton well washed flannel! I placed my interfacing on top and proceeded to cut. The brushed side of the flannel will be placed against the wrong side of the wool, in other words, wolves against wool on the inside. In the pic above you can see where I connected the hair canvas with a butted zigzag stitch to utilize what I had of this in my stash. I made sure grains matched  and cut. 

Once the interfacing was sewn to the wrong side of the flannel, one inch from the edge, it was trimmed back leaving an eighht of an inch SA. I don't want the interfacing caught in the seam allowance with the flannel, just too much bulk.

Here you can see the section placed on the  collar/facing section,  right side of flannel to wrong side of cashmere. 

Then I basted it all down and around with silk thread.  Now it is ready to proceed to construction. I am going to take more flannel, no hair canvas, and do a stay in the side front as well as across the upper back. Needless to say this addition of the flannel will also contribute to the warmth of the coat without adding much bulk.
Once all was placed and hand basted I replaced the pattern piece and trued up the edges. I do this often as I sew a project. It is amazing how inequities show up. And we wonder why things don't fit just right and have little ripples!
This edge was trimmed up for accuracy.  Now we can start actual construction! More to come!

 Yes, we are one of those blogs where you won't see the fab fashion shots although I will give photoing myself my best effort. Like Caroline and Barb, I am passionate about sewing, not so passionate about my fashion shoots. I hope you have had a chance to read their great blogs regarding this subject with which I wholeheartedly agree. Click on their names above to link to the posts. I do promise to always try my best to provide detailed photos of what's happening in my sewing world and hope you all continue to enjoy them. I love to share my passion with all who will gift me with their time and attention.
**********************************


Is this a bad photo above? Not quite. It's here to make a point. I have a couple of chotchkes and a few inspirational patterns on the shelf over my cutting table. This stuff changes slightly but never walks off the shelf by itself. But then, 3 days ago.....

I HAD A CRYOSEISM! Lest you think that is something pulled from the likes of Fifty Shades here's what happened:

I was in my yard crossing the field to feed my chickens at about 7:30 in the AM. It was brutally cold and I watched the thermometer drop from 11º to -8º in an hour and half.  There was no wind but I was freezing and wheezing as my very bundled up old bod made it's way across the field to the chicken barn. Halfway there I hear some branches snapping which always indicates some critter is around. Now that can range from a little red squirrel to a coyote or bear so I immediately stopped and looked around. This is not unusual. As I looked around, suddenly I heard the most incredible noise, an extremely loud "crack" sound. It was sharp and shook the ground. I was convinced some giant old tree was snapped across its middle in my side yard from where it seemed to emanate. Think of a pistol shot times 100. I know it's cold. Did my roof collapse on the back side? WTF? I after my adrenalin stopped its initial release I proceeded to feed my chickies while still on full alert. I knew something happened but not what.

Next day on our local weather there was discussion about cryoseisms, what they were, etc. Never heard of them. After researching and hearing this I knew that was exactly what happened. Back to the shelf picture...





I hadn't been in my studio in several days but when I went in yesterday to get back to work on my coat, this pattern and little dress form had fallen off the wall from our frost quake, aka, cryoseism. There are no poltergiests so I know that was it. Here's a little more info on cryoseisms:
Toronto cryoseisms

Wikipedia

Have you ever had a cryoseism?!!!....Bunny





32 comments:

  1. This is going to be a wonderful couture coat Bunny!
    I have two questions if you don't mind. 1) So what you are doing here is adding the hair canvas interfacing to the flannel then stitching/sewing it flannel side to wrong side of fashion fabric - am I correct? 2) Then you are planning on making a back stay, and front shoulder stays from the same flannel to place over the fashion fabric/interfaced flannel sandwich if I may? Or, are you planning on adding the flannel stay from the shoulder down the entire faced area of front? (if this makes any sense). 3) I keep telling myself that I CANNOT afford hair canvas. The lowest price I have seen is Pam's at a little less than $20 per yard. There must be something else that I can use, do you have any suggestions or advice?

    ReplyDelete
  2. You are correct on number one, Faye. On number two I am going to place more flannel, soft side to the wrong side of the cashmere, on those two sections, across the back and the side front piece also. There will be no interfacing there. I will show that on the blog in the next post. For ? number three, if I weren't spending the money on hair canvas I would use a fusible weft insertion. You wouldn't do any stitching on it for shape as you would on a lapel backed with hair canvas but it would be a good substitute for this pattern, IMO. When I need shape and use fusibles I steam the heck out of the piece once fused and shape it while on my ham and let dry without disturbing. That helps.

    A dear elderly neighbor friend from where we used to live, who is a graduate of FIT, broke down her sewing room and gifted me with loads of tailoring supplies. It was such a blessing. That hair canvas is expensive. I miss her. She was/is quite special and still stacks her wood at 90 years of age! Her vision deteriorated to the point that she couldn't enjoy her favorite pastime anymore and generously gave me pretty much the contents of her sewing room. I will be forever grateful but mostly grateful for her friendship.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Believe it or not I have two different coat muslins going at the same time so this was a real big help Bunny.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's great, Faye. Can't wait to see them. I do live in a VERY cold climate so all these layers help. I actually have another coat planned after this one, too!

      Delete
    2. hi,

      can you tell me the pattern number and maker of the the black tank and white-is skirt sitting on your fire place? The only name i can see is Edge. The skirt is very pretty

      Delete
  4. wow a frost quake, I think I will take my chances with our California earthquakes. because I can't take cold. That coat is looking good and I can't wait to see the result of all your tailoring. Cashmere - one of these day...Happy New Year, Beth

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's my second time to sew with it and it's lovely. You have to be very careful with the ironing as it is much like hair and scorches easily. Learned that the hard way but on a sample, thank goodness!

      Delete
  5. One of my sewing goals for 2014 is to take much more care in making my garments. Your post today was just what I needed to read. I never thought of putting the pattern piece back over the fabric. I can't wait to see your coat. And no, I have never experienced a cryoseism. Tornado, check. Hurricanes, check. Earthquake, check. And right now, a near blizzard.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pat, I have been sewing over fifty years and only in the last five or sew have I started to be more precise about pattern cutting. It became important when I started sewing all those peter pan collars for my granddaughters and became habit from there.

      Delete
  6. You're actually helping me formulate my own plan of attack on this pattern. I'll bet you didn't realize that, did you?

    My planned fabric is a mid weight wool that I planned to underline with flannel and line with kasha. Your post about using the flannel is most timely. You'll be finished before I've even started. I probably won't get started until sometime late January or February. Obviously I'm in no hurry for it this winter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's so cold around here right now that it makes finishing this coat even more pressing. It's 18 below zero right now.

      Delete
    2. We're at about 5 right now. Overnight it's supposed to be 0 with wind chills about 20 below. Brrr!

      I meant to add I've never heard of cryoseism before either. Any other casualties besides the shelf?

      Delete
  7. I love the care and thought you put into your sewing. Never heard of a cryoseism before! I was sidetracked though by the image of you out feeding chickens at minus minus degrees. And then your neighbor stacking wood at 80 years old. You're a hardy and multi-skilled bunch up north.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sort of goes with the territory. It's a different skill set to survive up here that's for sure.

      Delete
  8. Such great ideas and tips, Bunny! Have you seen Kenneth King's version of coat interfacing? Your reminds me of his but yours is sooo much more toasty using the wool instead of just cotton fabric. Hope your chickens are cozy in their house with those temps! Cashmere...to die for...made a jacket for a client once and wished it had been mine!

    ReplyDelete
  9. OK--that does it! I promise to quit b******g about our miserably cold 45 degree weather! Just discovered your blog a couple of months ago and I'm thoroughly enjoying your precision. Doesn't it take the enjoyment of sewing to an entirely different level when you concentrate on details instead of getting something made in the least amount of time possible?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow! Lei, you get it. I love it when someone gets it. Yes, it is so pleasurable to be able to concentrate and focus on the details. It puts me "in the zone."

      Delete
  10. Wonderfully detailed description of where & how you are going about this project, Bunny! Love looking over your shoulder.
    I've Never heard of a cryoseism before! I hope nothing in your home got cracked from the force...like pipes or windows or tile.
    DH asked if I heard "that loud noise at 2 am?" I did not but guessed it might have been a plow truck. Perhaps not...might have been a cryoseism, but I didn't know it!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You'll know it if it sounded like a "crack" or loud gun shot. This is not the rumbling type sound of earthquakes or lakes freezing.

      Delete
    2. Ah, I had forgotten that deep rumbling sound of lakes freezing. As an ice-skating kid in southern New England, it was thrilling.

      Delete
  11. Cryoseisms? Why did all my geology classes fail to mention this? Could it be that the classes took place in central and southern California? I am completely fascinated and distracted.

    Thank you for sharing the details of sewing your coat. It's a good reminder about the need to be more attentive to the procedural necessities.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Oh Bunny, here in California we have those cryoseisms all the time. ;) But I never knew what to call them!!

    I love watching you make this coat. Your blog is so valuable to me, not just because you share your talents and construct beautiful garments, but also because we are about the same size. So it's Monkey See, Monkey do. Thank you. I love the reminder to place my original pattern pieces over the cut fabric before construction to check for distortion.

    Stay safe out there! I lived most of my life near you, and i often miss the east coast.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Dear Bunny,
    Thank you so much for sharing your problem solving and details of a project. I get so frustrated when I am working on a project and expect it to go to together quickly and have at least a good result. Most often I am very disappointed. However, I read your blog and refer to the past tutorials and my aha moment today is to think out the project from pattern prep (your tutorial) forward. You are so appreciated.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Bunny - I just love that your coat has wolf flannel in it. The devil's in the details and the execution and somehow I just love the idea you'll be wearing your beautiful winter coat and inside, where no one will know, you'll have your 'recycled' pj fabric. Can't wait to see it all done up.

    ReplyDelete
  15. My grandmother would say, "There's more than one way to skin a cat"...I love your impromptu use of the flannel! I can tell this is going to be a great looking coat...I can't wait to see it!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I am perfectly happy to have more construction shots, details, and sewing tutorials than "fashion shots." Of course I want to see the finished project (inside and out), but honestly, one reason I read your blog is to see the how and why of what you sew. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  17. A frost quake...? wow you learn something everyday huh!
    hello from a new follower!
    bestest to you and yours
    daisy j

    ReplyDelete
  18. I am so enjoying the details of your coat making process, Bunny. No Cryoseisms here in Florida, just hurricanes and the occasional tornado. Although having grown up by Lake Erie makes me long for some of the winter scenes you sometimes talk about. So looking forward to the final reveal.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Enjoyed reading about your coat - but the Cryoseisms - very very interesting. Thanks for sharing that - learn something new everyday!
    Marciae from SG

    ReplyDelete
  20. I am in the middle of making my coat. I've cut the fabric but nothing else yet. In the midst of making bound buttonhole samples I realized that my fabric will not take fusible interfacing. I can use fusible ovals for backing the buttonholes if I use my needle board to press it on, but that's not practical for the whole coat, it's too small. I don't have a collar or lapels. I am about to order some hair canvas from Pam. Do I use it for the facings only and use the cotton flannel I was going to use to underline my lining on the outer fabric? It's been awhile since I made a coat without using fusbiles! What do you recommend?

    ReplyDelete

Engaging commentary: