Sunday, January 26, 2014

She hems and haws!


I had to show the piece de resistance first, didn't I? You probably were tempted to turn away from that hem title but look at that back neckline! Pretty cool, eh? I have run a folded strip of poly charmeuse all around the facing from hem, around the neck, and back down to the other hem facing. The charmeuse is sort of a tie dye look varying from navies, greens, to oranges and back, just the right tiny pop of color this dark coat needed. It's on the inside between  the lining and coat facing. I added my hanging loop chain and did a feather stitch on the pleat as well. I am going to make a label but that will go on the front facing, the better to impress when I whip open my coat!  {; )

So now lets get down and dirty with the hem situation. It took a LOOOOONG time, people. Bear with me as this was no simple hem. This pattern is basically a bathrobe with cool pockets so I really feel the additional touches of tailoring are going to hopefully take it out of that realm.
First I wanted to "pad" the hem. Nothing says homemade to me more than a pointy hem. Padding the hem will add a nice roll to the edge and add weight to the bottom so it will hang a bit better. I had enough howling wolf flannel to cut bias strips with a bit of piecing. I butted them up and pinked the top edge for no transferral. Where to place the strips? They extend on the bottom straight edge a quarter inch past the fold. when the hem is folded up the flannel is short enough to be well hidden. Did I say these were bias?

The bottom edge of the strip is catch stitched to the coat as well as connecting the abutting edges.


Once that was done the hem was folded up and basted on the edge with the silk thread again. In case you forgot the silk thread doesn't leave marks when steam pressed. Next I pressed just that edge on the wrong side on a thick towel with steam and a press cloth.

Check out that nice padded edge! Yahoo!

The top edge was bound, flipped over and stitched in the ditch with a bias strip of the same charmeuse edging the facing. There really is not all that lint on my coat. I had to do some adjusting so you could see the details.
The hem is now basted closer to the top about 3/4 of an inch from the edge. Are you counting how many passes I've made on this hem? I told you it wasn't a basic hem!

The bound edge is given a good steam press with oaktag under the seam to prevent showthrough, once again.


The top of the hem is flipped back and catchstitched to the coat. 


A completed, invisible, padded hem! Muy lindo, verdad?  These linty pictures are giving me the creeps as my coat fabric is so pretty in real life. I hope that comes through with the final photos. Thanks for bearing with me and my hem obsession. How many passes did you count? 
  1. Catchstitch flannel to coat
  2. Baste bottom edge
  3. Apply bias binding
  4. Ditch stitch bias binding
  5. Baste top of hem
  6. Catchstitch hem
I think that was all! So it was time consuming but I think it is worth the effort. The lining is sewn in and all that is left is sleeves and connect them to the lining. Almost there!.........Bunny





21 comments:

  1. It has been awhile since I made a coat so I am glad that you are making yours ahead of mine so that you can remind me of all the things that make a beautiful coat. I'm still on the muslin stage, but flannel back stay, check, gorgeous hem, check. I have never piped between the facing and the lining but I do love to do a Hong Kong finish on my hems and your treatment is lovely. Now I have to find a fabric that will complement my fashion fabric as well as yours does. Can't wait to see the finished coat.

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    1. Thanks so much, Nancy. I'm sure the perfect fabric will come along and your coat will be lovely. I just really felt all that black needed some sort of pop! Glad you agree.

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  2. This coat is proving to be a thing of beauty! I love all the touches--they raise it to another realm. The view of the chain, bright flash of color and feather stitching alone is truly lovely. You will have to master the art of draping the coat over a chair casually so that the wondrous inside view can wow passersby.

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    1. It won't be the first time! (wink) ;)

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  3. All the details will make this a stunning coat. I love the pop of color with the black fabric. Looking forward to the finished coat.

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  4. Who would imagine such a fine detail between the lining and the coat fabric...only you, Bunny! You make muy dificil into muy facil in 6 easy steps with great photos! Thanks for guiding us through this very very custom coat. Nice touch with the feather stitching at the top pleat...it is always a section forgotten and ignored...not any more!

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  5. I'm sorry to say that the title went right over my head, but it's early and I'm still working on my coffee. I love your details with the colorful binding, chain and featherstitch. Those details make the coat really special. I'm with you on the hem, it takes a long time but is so worth it. I did something similar with a dress last year and certainly don't regret the time.

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  6. Definitely out of the bathrobe with pockets realm!!! What a beautiful hem treatment - thanks for sharing!

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  7. Please, please: the hanging chain in my spouse's beautiful leather jacket has destroyed a few sweaters and is just about done killing the jacket. They look so cool and do so much damage! Stop them! (trying to keep this lighthearted, as your coat is stunning.)

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  8. Thank you for sharing your techniques! I'm sure your coat will look amazing. I have a question: the flannel/padding "floats" inside the hem and is not caught in any stitches once you remove the basting, is that right? Will that present any problems when washing/cleaning the garment? Thank you for your time!

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    1. The top edge of the flannel is secured with the catchstithing as are the joins. The bottom edge of the strip folds inside for about a 1/4 inch. The basting was to get the sharp edge of the hem not to secure the flannel strip. The hem is also catchstitched right above the flannel strip. I don't think it is going anywhere. You could secure the bottom edge with more catchstitching but I really don't think it is necessary. The flannel tends to stick to the wool even when nothing is securing it.

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  9. Mmmmm.....divine, Bunny. What is that very snazzy stitch you have securing the wearing ease pleat at the top of your lining?

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    1. That's a feather stitch, Vivien. Thanks for asking.

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  10. Amazing! I never would have thought of ANY of those special touches, Bunny, nor would I have know how to do them. You make it seem so easy....time consuming yes, but basically EASY!
    Thanks for sharing all your knowledge & ideas.

    fondly,
    Rett

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    1. It's not hard, Rett. You are right. It just takes time and we all have to decide how much time to put into a garment. For me the payback is there but others may differ.

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  11. Yo tambien lo creo. My Spanish might be a bit rusty. Your coat is coming together very nicely. It's worth the work. Somehow I get the idea that even if you were doing an honest to God bathrobe with fancy pockets, you would be just as meticulous.

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  12. I don't know about meticulous but I do have a philosophy of "I can't leave things alone". I just always feel like I have to add my stamp, that little something extra, sometimes known only to me.

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  13. It looks amazing! Also, I've just learnt a new technique - I've never thought of padding a hem. Nice touch and makes sense now that I've seen it. Can't wait to see the finished coat.

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  14. Wow! This is very nice, Good Job. I can't wait to see what the finished coat looks like.

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  15. Your attention to detail is paying off big time on this gorgeous coat. I love the featherstitching, pop of color, perfectly perfect hem....everything really! Thanks so much for taking us along on your latest sewing adventure and especially for sharing your thought process as you work your way through. Oh and yes....I would definitely drape this coat so the inside shows a bit while out to lunch with the girls. I'm sure you'll get more than a few admiring stares, if not comments : ).

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