Monday, September 24, 2012

Vogue 8676

Isn't this cotton velveteen yummy? My plan is to make a WARM, key word here, winter jacket, one without too much bulk. When it comes to high tech power linings for warmth I am in the land of the unknown. So quilted linings, heavy fleece linings, fur linings are out. I want that stuff that makes ski wear look svelte and allows you to ski at 0ยบ on a windy mountain. Do I use a windblocker and an insulating lining, both? Is there a product that will be one but serve the purpose of both?  I live in a climate where it can go two weeks at a time and never go above zero degrees at high noon. You can see how this warmth/lining issue is critical. Also, given my petite frame, I want something that won't let the garment overwhelm me.

I have gone to the Rain Shed and the Malden Mills websites but due to my inexperience with this sort of fabric am overwhelmed at what to buy. And this stuff's not cheap!!! The potential for a costly mistake is very high here. So basically I am asking for help with this. I will ask for samples but am still not sure I can trust a paper thin textile to keep me warm at those temps. So feedback and experience here is highly appreciated. Anything anyone can shed light on would be greatly appreciated.

This gets me to a personal quest of mine. In my sewing universe, I always want to try new experiences, fabrics, techniques, stretching myself over and over. I love developing TNT patterns but do not want to spend my life remaking the wheel.  I want to see something and feel I have the chutzpah to figure it out and do it, thereby expanding my sewing experience. I don't ever want to not try something. The way this blog shows garments from tiny smocked fluffs to tailored cashmere coats is a perfect example of that. I want to always be filling my sewing tool box with new and exciting tools. This jacket will be a hike along that journey. I don't ever want to lose that "wonder of the newbie" thinking I can try anything and pull it off. That, to me, is the fun of the sewing journey and a big part of what appeals to me about this craft, even after doing it for over fifty years.  OK, the bell has rung on Philosophy 101 for today!

The pattern for this jacket will be Vogue 8676.    This is a Marcy Tilton Design. I will use the "simple" version, letting the fabric speak for itself. You can see here the design lines are pretty straightforward.
Here you can see the tech drawing and how very plain View B is.
 This will have to go over sweaters with turtlenecks up in this climate so the shape is appropriate as well. I may give it a little bit of curve in on the sides. We'll see once it starts going together.

Because of the lining conundrum this will take a bit to figure out. In the meantime much else is in the queue and right now I will focus on the Koos Bag. Any enlightenment provided on the lining situation would be greatly experienced. Links to maybe a completed garment with such lining would be incredible to see and that would happen in a perfect universe. But in the meantime, understand that your input is greatly appreciated......Bunny

25 comments:

  1. will be really interested to learn the secrete of the lining that keeps the garment thin looking but still provides that warmth.

    love the fabric and the pattern.

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  2. That fabric is to die for!! Will make a wonderful coat. A real show stopper.

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    1. Isn't it scrumptuous? It is from Apple Annie's. There is also a brown/red/gold colorway, enabler that I am!

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  3. I haven't made a winter coat yet, but started looking for warm lining material and found 3M Thinsulate on the http://www.voguefabricsstore.com website. I look forward to seeing your version of this Vogue coat--I bought this pattern, too.

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  4. Bunny: due to my decade old MM addiction I have sewn with the wind blocking technical fabrics from Malden Mills as well as the silk weight powerdry. I have found them all to be warm tho very thin with the wind blockers the warmest. The only problem is that the wind blocker fabric I had may not stand up to dry cleaning according to the mfg'r website. They have all washed well in the machine. I hang dry to avoid static electricity. The fleece type is too clingy to use as a lining so stick with a microfleece. I am wearing a microfleece bathrobe right now as it was 42 degrees in the house this morning. The fabric in a different color is similar to this one http://www.ebay.com/itm/Textured-MicroFleece-Fabric-Malden-Mills-Paynes-Plum-Gray-60-in-X-the-yard-/350499787142?pt=US_Fabric&hash=item519b6a5186

    Good luck! If I can give you more info please email me.

    A call to the company's store might clarify the dry cleaning issue.

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    1. This is definitely a machine wash project. Thanks for this input.

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  5. Your velveteen is so pretty. It glows!
    Like Connie, thinsulate sprang to mind for me. I've used it in potholders and oven gloves.

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  6. I would google Rose City Textiles and give them a call. They carry all kinds of high tech fabric for out door wear.

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  7. I agree with the Rose City Textiles recommendation. Annette is the kind of person who would genuinely enjoy helping you find the right fabric.

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  8. I live in Alaska and the native people here have mastered the "parka". It is always made with cotton velvet or velveteen as the outer shell and lined with a quilted lining, which comes in various weights. Google winter weather in Barrow or Nome and you'll see that if it works for them, it'll keep you toasty too, LOL! I think the nicest way to go would be to quilt the lining yourself, use the lofty heaviest type of thinsulate and something lightweight and tightly woven, maybe micrifiber as the lining. I'd avoid fleece as lining as it would stick to the sweater underneath and restrict movement. I made one coat where I quilted my lining fabric to fleece, while warm, it isa bit too heavy though. Stick with thinsulate, its the good stuff! Love, love love your blog and I just can't wait to see your finished jacket! The fabric/pattern combo is looking fabulous! Kaie

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  9. Forgot to mention, the quilted lining ladies here use is 2 layers of lightweight ripstop nylon with the lofty stuff sandwiched in between. I think the layer of nylon directly under the cotton velveteen is the key to protection from the wind and it wouldn't add any significant extra weight either. Good luck! Kaie

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    1. A big thank you being sent backatcha to Alaska for all this great info. It is amazing that they use the cotton velveteen as well. Now, If I can just find some fur for a hood! ;)

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    2. You can get fur to trim the hood from The MacPhee workshop, www.macpheeworkshop.com

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  10. Bunny, Thinsulate is the way to go. A good place to get it plus all kinds of goodies for outerwear is www.seattlefabrics.com They are very helpful and they offer samples. I also live in Alaska, my husband currently works in Savoonga a Yupik village off the coast from Nome--I made him snow pants for walking to and from the school and contains thinsulate, he's warm even at -50F.
    Oh, real fur would be really nice and it would also be warm.

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  11. I was going to say Thinsulate, as well, but double check and make sure it can be machine washed! I've used SeattleFabrics in the past for ordering such stuff. Here's the link to the thinsulate and others: http://www.seattlefabrics.com/insulations.html

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  12. It sounds like you've gotten some good advice from people in the know! Our weather here on LI rarely that cold.

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  13. Interesting quest! Sounds like Thinsulate in some form or fashion is the way to go, but I'd also research silk fabrics for your inner lining. I'm going to research Thinsulate as I've never used it before and just want to learn more. Warmth is absolutely key, that's for sure; but I always try to consider fabrics that breath as well as provide warmth; this I remember from when I lived way up in the Sierras where it was snowy and cold. Hey, by the way! I have this jacket pattern also, and it's on my table as an upcoming project. Very nice pick!

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  14. I know thinsulate works. About 30 years ago I lived in Fairbanks, Alaska. I made my daughter snow pants and a jacket using Thinsulate and she was cozy and warm without bulk. The have probably improved it since them. It was like working with quilt batting.

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  15. I have this pattern. I am hoping to make it out of a beautiful piece of pendelton blue and grey plaid wool that I won from Club BMV, but I have been afraid to cut into it. I will look forward to seeing what you work out with the interlining for warmth.

    Stephanie in MD

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  16. This is going to be a GORGEOUS jacket, Bunny! I so admire how you are unafraid to tackle new things.

    Back in my skiing days, I remember "Gortex" as being very popular in the clothing, but I think that was more for its waterproof properties. I also have a jacket that says 'thinsulate' on the tag & it is nice & warm.
    You can get a sample pack of various wts of thinsulate for only $2 here:

    http://www.seattlefabrics.com/insulations.html

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    1. Thanks, Rett. I am going to send for those samples today!

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  17. There was an article in an old issue of Threads on sewing a warm coat, Kathleen Brenne wrote it I think. She wrote that a windshield in the upper back and maybe the chest as well added to the warmth immensely. I think that she used chamois, but you'd have to find the article. If you don't have it, email me and I will see if I can find it for you.

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    1. Nancy, I've got nearly every issue and the index is online so I'll look it up. Thanks for reminding me. Sounds like I have found my go to on cold weather coats! Thanks so much.

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  18. That velveteen is gorgeous - and that pattern looks like a perfect match!

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  19. A little late---but Windbloc fleece from MM is great. I have used it as a lining and it is very warm. You just need to ask them to label which side is supposed to go next to your skin. One side is wicking and you can't always tell. I have made at least 2 winter coats with fleece on the inside and something waterproof on the outside- and was toasty warm. They were not thick or bulky either. They worked for my Buffalo NY winter. Rochelle Harper has 2 books on sewing fleece and outerwear and she has lots of great advice on how to do it. If the weave of the velveteen is tight enough, you may not need windbloc and that would be less expensive. You can just use regular fleece.
    Thinsulate will be warm also. But you need a lining to put under the Thinsulate before you can wear it. It is kind of like quilt batting and is not made to be next to your skin or even a sweater. It is made to have a thin lining between it and you. So your coat would have to be 3 layers if you used thinsulate. Velveteen, thinsulate and ling fabric. I think that would be not a good idea with this pattern. Fleece would be easier.
    I have made a lot of fleece garments and taught classes on sewing with it. Feel free to contact me if you have questions.
    TC Ferrito tcsewhat@roadrunner.com

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