Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Wednesday Words

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Courtesy igniteafrica.tv


"In this collection, it seems like the clothes were made first and then dyed afterwards, or at least were garment washed after construction to affect and distress the fabrics. It is this process which either intentionally, or unintentionally, has caused the technical problems with the details in the collection. The puckered seams and wavy zipper tapes seem to be the result of putting the garments through wash cycles and treatments, potentially at high temperatures, where all of the components have shrunk at different rates. The thread on the seams reacts differently to the surrounding fabric, and the zipper tapes buckle against the edges of garments.
But the question is, when do we applaud these details for being cleverly engineered methods for creating the mood of the collection and when do we draw the line and just call them construction issues?"  .....from the Cutting Class on the Yeezy spring summer collection.



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Wednesday Words are quotes gleaned from the internet, blogs, books, newspapers and more. They are never my own words. They are not my opinions but merely comments written that made me go "hmmmmm,,,,,,,". Some may be provocative, some may not. Some may be my opinion, some may not. My goal is to start a conversation among followers of this blog and hopefully learn as we share our thoughts. I know you will do so respectfully and intelligently and  I thank you for that...Bunny

29 comments:

  1. Construction issues? That's being polite.

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  2. At first glance the group shot looks like concentration camp survivors. On a closer look it looks like concentration camp survivors dressed like the homeless. If that's the look Kanye was going for " nailed it". ( I shake my head at the whole fashion industry)

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    1. I had the same reaction. But real people wear his clothes and the styles filter down. Ugh.

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  3. I found it uncomfortable to look at. Could he be making a statement of some sort?

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  4. Thank goodness that I am not the only person, on seeing this, who just shudders. This man is making millions out of this?? Can you imagine if we churned out this standard ( or should I say below standard) of workmanship and then said it was meant to look so shoddy..................I despair.

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  5. Ugh! What a terrible mess! More and more clothing in retail stores is just awful. Even the samples in sewing magazines are sometimes poorly done, with uneven stitching, tacky hems and zippers. It hurts me to even look at this stuff.

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  6. If my sewing project looked like this, I would classify it as a wadder and then wonder what Bunny would have done differently to prevent such a mess.

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  7. Whether you like the look or not there are still a lot of really technical things going on which requires special skills beyond neat and tidy sewing. I tip my hat to the production team because they will be responsible for duplicating these rather organic techniques to ensure that all garments look equally as distressed. Creating the consistency in shrinkage control for fabric and trims across the sizes and dye lots consistency will be a feat that I am glad I am not responsible for. Making one sample for a fashion show is the easy part. However, this type of mass production, even on a small scale, is a whole new ball game with many,many variables. You have to at least appreciate that.

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    1. I daresay that much fast fashion ends up looking this way after several turns around the washer and dryer. So, I think they have the mass production down. My appreciating the manufacturing process, not so much. Thanks for your input.

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    2. Even if the clothes aren't appealing to me I'm always impressed by the way the fast fashion industry can churn garments out. There's obviously a lot of thought and organization behind it.

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    3. And a lot of back breaking cheap cheap labor. Thanks for your thoughts.

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    4. "Creating the consistency in shrinkage control for fabric and trims across the sizes and dye lots consistency will be a feat..."

      I am not sure that a lot consistency will be needed. As long as the garment is sufficiently rumpled-looking, which is easily achieved by simply removing it from the packing box, then a "this garment is unique. Any inconsistencies are art..." tag can be hung on it and people will buy it anyway because his name is on it.

      That first outfit is awful. Concentration camp chic? It leaves me wondering who wears this and to where?

      Those pics reminds me of a pair of 'thai fisherman' pants (very baggy shapeless rumpled pants with a waist tie string) that I love wearing around my studio. And nowhere else. They are comfy, but utterly hideous.

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  8. Definitely wadders for all the sewists I know. This collection and style will not last! Karen

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  9. Assuming the Yeezy effect was deliberate, I don't respond to it. A home sewer can't risk having people think that the problem is incompetence. S/he can't get away with calling it fashion.

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  10. I do think it's fascinating. It seems to take what I see "on the street" to an extreme level. Maybe it will wake us up. Maybe save us from softly slipping into a zombie mob.

    As for me, I'm 5'2" and over 20, so if I dressed like this someone would likely call social services.

    Thanks, Bunny. Very though provoking! I skipped my normal neutrals today and am wearing bright turquoise, in response to all that blah. They are haunting images - and I feel better about my hair.

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  11. What boggles my mind is people buy this stuff! If I wanted clothes that looked this bad, I would go to Goodwill and rummage through their racks. And it isn't just this collection that sells sloppy work for big bucks. I saw a picture of some patched, torn jeans in a magazine for $275!!!!!

    Thank goodness we have the option to make our own clothes! :)

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    1. What is the fashion world coming to??? Unattractive, underfed, gawky models, clothes which look like it came from a rag heap, etc. What is next? Bring back some glam quality and let's see what happens.....Lydia

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    2. I agree completely...I will never understand why people want to look like utter slobs and spend money to achieve it.

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  12. Homeless people begging in my town dress better than this mess. He wants to show all shades of skin...marvelous...that's his thing...not mine.

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  13. It will be interesting to see how well this collection sells. People with more money than brains will buy this junk, but the rest of us? Don't think so.

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  14. Goodness...I don't know what to say. It's so awful. It's almost as if sloppy and unkempt is the latest fashion trend.

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  15. I really like these styles and the way they make you (well, me anyway) feel like a "cool kid" when wearing them. I like the way they feel all drapey (is that a word?) and heavy and slouchy on my body. Thank goodness I don't have the budget, and do have a brain that tells me that as a 60 year old granny, the cool kid ship has sailed. What you have made me aware of is that if money and sense were no object, I'd be first in line to pay big bucks for these. If I'd made them myself, I'd be crying in the corner over all the time and money spent on such a mess. This is one of those "things that make you go, hmmmmmmm". Is it marketing genius that makes me want to buy and look good in these clothes, or should I give a my pile of sewn and rejected projects a second look? Thanks for the great post and comments!

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  16. I am not a fan of this sort of clothing for myself. OK, I wouldn't be buried in it. That's just my taste. However, it bugs me that the people who really can carry it off are the ones who look like the models. Anyone else looks like a bag lady. I find that kind of "star bellied sneech" fashion thinking as obnoxious as the finishing issues mentioned, and the exploitation of workers involved. xo

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  17. Looks like a mess but I guess that was the intention. Manufacturing these sidesteps many construction and fit issues. They will probably sell and those who buy will think they are attractive. It's just not my taste. Thanks for an interesting post.

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    1. Having worked in a garment factory, it never ceases to amaze me how downright cost cutting is passed off on the unknowing public as fashion. You are right on the sidestepping. The challenge to the manufacturer and designer is how can we look creative and fresh and squeeze that margin a bit tighter.

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    2. It's "raw hems" all over again.

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  18. First off, IMHO wearing more than one piece of that collection at a time would send the look from interesting to a royal hot mess. And I totally agree that these finishes new off the rack and hailed as trendy or groundbreaking from fashion designer would be deemed loving hands at home from a home sewer, even if the garment was perfect before laundering.

    I've worn garments with those finishes, but they were honestly earned after many cycles of laundering, mending, and getting grubby while growing up on a farm. I'm just wondering if he's mocking or trying to honor those who wear garments like these honorably through hard work or through inability to have better clothing.

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