Sunday, September 25, 2011

Dolce y Gabana

I have my boucle. I have my hand painted silk charmeuse lining. I HAD visions of doing a classic Chanel jacket using  the more "speedified" method from Threads as opposed to the Kahlje method. Then I saw this on Net-a-Porter.  I am in love! Are those vertical strips slenderizing or what? It looks so great with the jeans. It is the length I love. The mix of fabric and textures is also right up my alley.

After inspecting this a lot the following occurred to me about the construction.  I need your help, bloggers. This garment appears to be made, and I could be wrong here, with the technique that lines and finishes each section as it is sewn together. I hope I am expressing myself clearly. I don't know what this technique is called so don't know how to search it on the  web. I do know pretty surely  that someone on PR was giving classes on this sort of construction. Does this ring bells with anyone? Is there a name to this particular construction? I know it exists but am drawing a blank here. Can anyone shed some light on what my vague memory is trying to recall? It would be greatly appreciated.

Oh,yeah, the price on this is $1045.00 but if you buy today, madam, you can have it for the low,low, price of $625.00! You must order within the next hour. The first fifty orders will also recieve one free ShamWow! Doesn't get much better than that! 


Thanks for the comments on the cushions. Audrey really likes them. I finished the second large cushion last night and will power on through the two bolsters now. I am waiting for additional fabric to arrive before cutting it all out as I want to cut so what remains can be used in the window treatment.

Selena's bishop will have its  smocking finished probably today. It does need some more embellishment beyond the smocking, IMO. I will make those decisions when all smocking is complete. I might smock some pockets too. We'll see........Bunny

19 comments:

  1. The stitch and flip method is maybe what you're thinking of. Shannon Gifford pioneered it and there is a Threads article she wrote.

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  2. The late Shannon Gifford's Stitch-and-Flip Jacket. There was a class on Pattern Review which I took and there was an article in Threads magazine. www.threadsmagazine.com/item/4614/line-and-underline-in-one-step Love this jacket. Can't wait to see your version. It also reminds me of a Vogue Details jacket pattern V8332 where the seams were on the outside and finished in some way to make the jacket was reversible. It might be a possible alternate technique.

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  3. Thank you for the compliment on my circle skirt, Bunny. I'm working on the beading today (it's raining here)...and then it will be done. That was a TON of applique!

    This jacket is something I would make in a heartbeat. You'll share your journey with us, won't you? I'm headed over to Threads right now to check out the link that Audrey posted.

    Kathy

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  4. GORGEOUS! Did you paint your own lining? I know you can!

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  5. but does the Stitch & Flip method result in contrasting seams on either side? I don't remember that. I would think this jacket is sewn WS together and then the SAs are bound with the contrast fabric before being sewn flat to the fashion fabric.

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  6. I agree with Kay that about the construction of this jacket. It's a beautiful jacket and very you.

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  7. Wow! Love it... The colors, the print, everything! Have saved the pictures to take with me on my next NYC shopping trip.

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  8. Okay I will be waiting with baited breathe as you construct this jacket because the original is beautiful but I'm sure your's will be stunning!

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  9. Several years ago I made a jacket sort of like this with some Cynthia Guffey seams. I am away from my sewing books now, but she has several seams with distinctive names, and I know one results in a look very much like this.

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  10. This is wonderful. You have given me lots to research. I will be using a new princess seam jacket pattern so need to work out that muslin first. This jacket is double breasted. I do have to say, upon inspection of the details shown on the site, it is not the finest construction from where I stand. I am getting excited. Keep the ideas coming.Thanks so much everyone. I am off to dig up that Threads article. I think there will be some experimentation here before committing to any technique. Claire Schaeffer has some wonderful seam techniques in her books too. Thanks again!

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  11. I love this jacket too! I like your taste:-). I look forward to seeing how you ultimately construct it.

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  12. Diane Ericson and Lois Ericson both do a lot of that type construction. I made on garment, DianeEricson's Java Jacket using that techniue. The pattern had you sew fashion fabric piece and lining RST, leaving an opening to turn. The just sew the seams. Of course, the fit has to be spot on before you sew the seams because there's no way to alter afterward.

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  13. I think you might be looking for flat lining? There is a discussion here Diary of a Sewing Fanatic, I searched pants, and it references a Threads article. http://sewingfantaticdiary.blogspot.com/2011/01/pair-of-pants.html
    Kathy

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  14. Now that you frame it as flat lining, Kathy, which I am very familiar with, I can see how that would easily work. That may be the way I go but first I will research all the options mentioned. Thanks so much everyone.

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  15. OK - I'm like Carolyn, I'm anxious to see how you solve this problem, but I will be honest here, sewing is a little like computers, there's usually 15 ways to do something the right way...so for me there's not one perfect technique...like we all have our fav technique of inserting a sleeve header into 2" of space!!! I'm thinking that some variation on the stitch-and-flip method would be great (that's the one that looks most logical after a close up of this picture http://cache.net-a-porter.com/images/products/114442/114442_cu_l.jpg), but looking forward to future posts on this.

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  16. A year or two ago there were a couple of episodes of Sewing With Nancy, demonstrating a method of making reversible jackets, using strips of the two fashion fabrics to join each seam in such a way that the opposite fabric showed on the seams of each side of the jacket. Betty Cotton demonstrated her Cotton Theory Seam Finish. Some of the jackets were quilted, but not all had a batting interlining; some were just the two layers of fashion fabric. The style of jacket was very different - raglan sleeves, no collar or lapels, etc.

    Looking more closely at the D&G jacket on the website you provided, the seams are not done in the Betty Cotton style, but I wonder if that style could be used anyway? The collar, lapels, and pocket trims would have to be figured out.

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  17. Love that jacket, and I'm sure there are any number of ways to get the look.

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  18. Ha. I realized after I posted that YOU have tutorials on flatlining!Silly me. Like I am telling you something new. But that is what I thought of when I saw the picture, anyway. I will enjoy seeing how you work out this puzzle.

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  19. I have made a couple of jackets using the stitch and flip method as taught by Shannon Gifford and am about to make a rayon/poly brocade hoodie (should be fun) using the same technique. The seams do not need to be topstitched (just one of her design details) so I see no reason why you could not top-stitch a bias strap to the center back seam and sleeve seam then go from there. The jacket is really quite intriguing.

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