Friday, May 2, 2008

Better Computerized Buttonholes

Buttonholes on today's computerized machines can be rather temperamental. I keep my old 35 pound mechanical Kenmore around for just that reason! But not long ago I just didn't feel like hauling it out for one buttonhole and went to the Pfaff instead, my computerized machine. Reality is that the buttonholes on this type of machine can be heavily influenced by any nearby seams or any inequity of height in the area under the foot. Since most buttonholes are next to facings, waistlines, and cuffs, the height difference on one side can mess up the buttonhole to be stitched out. A perfect example is the picture above where I am doing one buttonhole on a pants waistband. The area on the left of the foot includes the thickness of the inner trimmed seams. The area to the right of the foot includes nothing but a double layer of fabric. There is interfacing the full width of the band. This is where the light bulb goes on! We all know how "hump jumpers", "jean-a-ma-jigs", and/or the folded piece of cardboard are put behind the presser foot to equalize the level of the foot and to allow continued even stitching. Tah-Dah! It occurred to me to put a folded piece of paper under the side of the foot that isn't thick with inner SAs. It worked. Hope you try this tip and let me know how it worked for you. I have used it a few times with the desired results......

I am on a pants binge with the next pair being out of a rayon/linen blend. They are lined and with the tweaks I did to my sloper fit pretty awesomely (?). Soon as they are hemmed I will get up some pics. They look so differently from the cotton twill ones....

I am also in the final stretch of the baby toile. It is darling but no pics till I make a bonnet to match. The capris are all done. The top is nearly put together with the bullions and smocking completed. Now all we need is a bonnet. Can't have my little redhead getting a sunburn....

Lace of the day:
This is a collar that was in the collection. The fabric is snow white pique. You would never know this was very old. The center front is wonderful but the neckline has this tatting connected by very tiny ric rac. A lot of the pieces that I inherited had this tiny ric rac on them. Very ladylike, to say the least! I often wonder what the dress would have been like that went with this crisp looking collar.

11 comments:

  1. Excellent tip, Bunny! I'll be sure to use this one.

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  2. Thanks for the buttonhole tip, Bunny! I swear, I'm going to make pants "one of these days" and this will come in handy. I love that tiny ric-rac.

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  3. Thanks for the tip and I LOVE the tatting - sooo pretty! I am enjoying your blog - had to do a game of catch-up tho!

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  4. Thank you for sharing the wonderful bits of Irish lace. I so love to see them at the end of your posts.

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  5. Glad you all enjoyed the lace and the tip. Good to see you, Laurie. I know you have been soooo busy.
    Some of the lace is Irish, but there are all sorts in my collection. Lots more to come. I had more phone cleaning up and organizing it. I still have pieces I haven't "cleaned up" and played with yet. There were some nice silk pieces but dry rot set in on them some years back and they have gone on to lace heaven.
    Paula, you can certainly make pants with your abilities. Once you get your sloper worked out you can whip them up in a day. That is if you don't get involved in other "stuff" like I have lately.

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  6. Does anyone know if there is a way to edit a post on blogger? I hate it when I see my spelling mistakes. They are sooo sooo obvious, I can't stand it.

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  7. Oh - this is soooo helpful! I had trouble on a wool jacket that I made. The keyhole part of the buttonhole kept coming out lopsided... I'll be sure to try this tip next time! Thanks! P.S. Don't you love those "ta-da" sewing moments?

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  8. Bunny, do you mean your post or your comment? I'm not sure about the comments...I've actually deleted some of mine and re-posted. You can edit the posts either by clicking the little pencil icon at the bottom of the post or by clicking on the "posts" tab under customize, then clicking the "edit" tab.

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  9. Oh, and thanks for the vote of confidence on the pants. My apprehension it two-fold. First, I worry about not being able to make a good job of it and make them fit properly. Second, I worry that I'll make them and feel like a dork if I wear them. I haven't worn any pants but jeans for many years. I think I want some, though, with think being the operative word.

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  10. Paula, sometimes fit is a journey. I love how people post on PR with their garment and then the "pros' kick in with the suggestions. I learn so much from that. Debbie Cook's posts are just incredible when it comes to fit. My pants sloper that I am using now is a much morphed clone of a pair of pants whose fit I loved. I took them apart and used that as my start. I also have decided that at this stage of my life my body is always changing. So it is a continual effort to take the sloper and make it fit anew. I can't wait to post my linen/rayon pants as I really like the fit, no wrinkles, just skims! So you can do this and just have to decide it is something you want to achieve. Just look at it as another sewing challenge. You have certainly handled other sewing challenges beautifully. Keep us posted!

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  11. Well I intend to actually end up with a wardrobe which is why I stared the wardrobe sew along, so I'll have to make some bottoms sooner or later! Thanks so much for the encouragement.

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