Wednesday, June 17, 2009

Sheer Hem Technique


I thought I would share the hem/edge technique I will use on my blouse, BWOF #122-3,6-09, that you saw in the last post. After some fiddling with my last sheer hem, I came up with what was for me an original edge treatment but have since seen it referred to in BWOF 6/09. Their directions are cursory so here are mine in a little more detail. It is quite simple.

I start with the starch you see above. I love this starch. It is REAL starch. You mix 1 part starch to 4 parts water for a heavy treatment. That is what I generally use. I put it in my spray bottle labeled so no one else can scoot that bottle away to put bug spray or some other sort of poison in it. Spray your hem area and iron it dry. Do a test run, particularly if you are using silks. I have had very good luck with this starch. I spray, let it sit for a full minute, then iron dry. The body can be removed with a wash and you will also see on some fabrics it just flakes off.

Next I fold over to the wrong side and iron a 5/8 inch seam allowance until dry. This gets quite stiff which is what you want. Now to the machine to stitch.

Set the machine at a basic zigzag with a 2.0 width and a .7 length. Use a fine weight embroidery thread and a size 8 universal needle. You can find this at all the chains as well as on line. I have the fine thread in the bobbin as well as on top. With the fold of the edge a hair to the right and the right side up, start stitching. If you are positioned correctly the edge will roll as it is stitched. After stitching take your scissors and trim back the excess seam allowance to the zigzagged edge. Done! I have put this on my fingers so you can get an idea of the scale of this edge treatment. It is finer than my serger's rolled hem and I didn't have to change the plate in the serger either. Mine is an oldy and I detest doing that. Adjusting the machine is much quicker and easier.


I will be using this edge on my sheer blouse but first I will make a muslin....bunny

34 comments:

  1. Thanks for the info on the hem. I have been wanting to make something with sheer material, but had no idea how to hem! Seeing your explanation, I think that I have a RTW silk scarf that is hemmed in the same way, even though it is not a sheer.

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  2. Wonderful hem technique, thank you for sharing.

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  3. Thank you for posting this technique. I like to starch the edges of those knit fabrics that tend to roll to the right side. I starch the edges, then iron dry. The stabilized edges won't roll.

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  4. Sounds so easy. Thanks so much.

    www.sewingwithtrudy.blogspot.com

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  5. I've used this technique and love it!

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  6. Excellent! Thank you. This is much more delicate than a rolled serger hem.

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  7. Bunny what a cool technique and thanks for sharing it in detail - having done this too many time in a way more complicated way, it's great to see this in detail. Inspires me to go find a sheer blouse to make!

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  8. Thanks Bunny!
    This is somewhat similar to a rolled Heirloom hem, so of course I'm wondering what foot you use. i.e., to coax the fabric to roll. It's definitely a lot easier than the the "stitch 5/8", fold and press, stitch again, trim, fold and press again, stitch again" method, and it looks lovely! I'm about to make something out of chiffon, and will definitely use this technique.

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  9. beautiful hem Bunny!!!! thanks for the tips!!!

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  10. Cissie, I use a regular clear foot that allows me to see the edge of the fabric clearly and to gauge its location. I do not use a foot that "assists" the roll. That is where it gets "messy" in my efforts. The clear plain foot keeps everything placed nice and tight.

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  11. Thank you so much for sharing this technique! The final result is PERFECT!

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  12. I saw an old 2006 post of yours on patternreview.com about sheer draperies. Your tips were more the most helpful, so I am looking for more tips. I am getting ready to make 18' long x 81" wide sheer panels. I looked up the weighted cord for the bottom you suggested and found 3 different weights 0.75 oz, 1 oz and 1.5 oz. Any recommendations? I am planning a 4" head and hem and 1.5" side hems. They will hang from cubicle curtain type track with clips.

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  13. Thank you very much for this tutorial. I almost gave up on a beautiful vintage (sheer) blouse,when I did a search I was able to find your blog. What a beautiful ,clean finish with this technique ! Best I've seen.
    Again Thank You,
    elise

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  14. Thankyou so much for your great tute! :)

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  15. Hi Bunny,

    Just to let everyone know, I have been working on silk georgette this week, making a top for my teenage daughter.

    I looked and tried all the technques suggested..........I found yours was the best Bunny. I liked Kenneth Kings which suggested using the 3 groove pintuck foot, but found it a bit too rigid for my very very flimsy silk georgette.

    Thrilled to report to everyone, Bunnys worked absolutely beautifully. I just had to slightly tweek the machine settings for my sewing machine.

    Thanks a million Bunny.
    Happy Christmas, one and all.
    Marysia, aka Smockerlady.

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  16. Just came here from your comment on Gertie's blog, and I'm so glad I did. This is beautiful, and I'm no longer hesitant to fix the hem on my beautiful dress!

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  17. Hi Bunny,

    Just found your blog from Gertie's page. I'm bookmarking this and planning on looking deeper on your blog. I'm intrigued by your learning "heirloom sewing from Spanish nuns..." Thanks for sharing your widsom with the rest of us!

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  18. Thank you for sharing Bunny, very nicely done! You win.

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  19. Hello Bunny! I, too, just found your tutorial and blog from Gerties New Blog for Better Sewing. I'm so glad I did! I'm going to be one of your faithful followers from now on! I really appreciated your narrow hem tutorial. I will find something sheer to sew just for the sake of it. Beautiful results. Thank you! Muriel

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  20. I cannot THANK YOU enough for this tutorial! You may have just cured a dilemma I've had on a certain garment for 10 years!! xoxox!

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  21. Thank you so much for posting this tutorial.

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  22. I have sew bridal wear for years and this is the best trick I have seen. Just love it!!!

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  23. Thank You! I've sewn for many years and struggled hemming chiffon. My daughter is marrying and guess what I'm to wear? A long chiffon dress which I am in the process of sewing, I've put off completing because I was dreading the hem. Now, I'm excited. Thank You!!

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  24. I have been sewing for years and this is a great tip that I never even thought to try. Thank you so much for sharing.

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  25. Thank you so much for sharing this tip! I find it very helpful.

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  26. Thank you so much for sharing this tip! I find it very helpful.

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  27. Thank you so much for a very clear and simple tutorial. Do you think this method would work to finish a sheer neckline on a blouse? I've been debating finishing the neckline with a satin bias tape, or trying to sew it.

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    1. I would definitely do some samples first but I think if you are able to manipulate the SA into a nice fold, it should work. I would love to know how this worked out for you. I am thinking pressing the starched damp SA should help with the maneuvering.

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  28. It is because of you that I am still sane. The chiffon skirt on the prom dress is beautifully hemmed because of this tutorial. Thank you!

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    1. You are so welcome, Stephanie. Miles of chiffon can tax the sanity level of any sewist!

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  29. I have delayed starting my S1621 jacket as I wanted to make it in a silk fabric for the very reason stated more than once on your blog. Now, I have something to work with. I found your blog as I was searching through Bloglovin. You caught my attention because I am of Spanish heritage and my nickname is Bunny too. Conejitas rule. ����������

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  30. Thank you Bunny! I can't wait to try this method! Question: where is that starch sold at? thanks

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  31. I get mine at Kmart or our local supermarket. It lasts a long time as it is concentrated and you water it down.

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