Sunday, March 18, 2012

Simplicity 2466, Carly's Circle Dress

Would you look at this mess? I have lots of issues with this pattern. Yesterday I went through my patterns for little girls and found this darling Daisy Kingdom dress, Simplicity 2466.
It is a full circle around with a separate hem band. The sleeves are gathered with elastic inside but the yoke is flat. It's an all around twirly girl dress including the flower at the neckline and the big flat flower on the skirt hem which is hard to see. It looks sort of like a sun rising out of the hem band. See that mess on the couch? Thats the four, larger than usual, pattern tissues for this dress. There are lots of pieces and the pattern takes a lot of fiddling. Some pieces are overlapped and need to be traced and others aren't. Separate pieces are drawn out for the shorter top. Why not just have a "cut here for top" line on the dress pieces? Clearly there is no worry about concern over our forests with all the paper used in this one. I haven't seen a pattern this big with so many pieces since my wedding gown, seriously. Anyway, its really cute and I'm powering through.


Because I only had a yard of the large print I came up a bit short on one part of the circular skirt. After talking it over with myself I remembered that often in bias garments there is piecing, so I just went for it. Here's what I did in case you ever have this problem.
First I arranged my pattern piece so it was on grain on my board. Then I cut the nasty raw edge so it was perpendicular to the grain, nice and straight. Then I had to look through what little was left to find an "almost" match. I knew I couldn't have a total match with the amount of fabric I had left. I matched it best I could while keeping the same grain on the new piece. I cut a strip long enough to fill in the missing fabric, stitched it on to the skirt, serged and pressed it. The I recut the pattern.  I think it looks quite good. At this point I am actually nearly complete on the dress and you don't even notice it.
I think it was a good save. Once that was done I started on the dress. I spent most of the day cutting yesterday. I haven't taken so long to cut something in a long time. I have three different fabrics being used here. That takes a lot of thought and time and going back and forth with the cutting.  I also had to make bias binding. All of that with adding on the missing fabric just took a lot of time before I could actually get started.
Once again, there is no mention in the pattern of interfacing or understitching. I interfaced the yoke and understitched. I mean, these dresses are clearly going to be made from lightweight, usually cotton, fabrics. They need interfacing, Pattern People! The better someone's finished garment comes out the more likely they will buy another pattern to sew some more, duh! Oy,,,,,all I have left to complete the dress is the hemband and I should get that on tomorrow....Bunny

13 comments:

  1. This sounds like quite a pattern, good for you for keeping on though, I'm excited to see the finished product!

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  2. Ooh, I think I have that pattern, thanks for the tips. It looks like I'll need them.

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  3. What beautiful fabrics! If it were me, I think it would be a print and a solid. I just can't get the hang of mixing prints. These are just gorgeous together! Thanks for the info on interfacing. Sometimes I forget I don't have to follow the instructions to a T, and I might like the outcome better if I don't.

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  4. I'm anxious to see the finished product!

    SueC56

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  5. Bunny I almost think they want to quit making patterns. After all, a new sewist would be so disappointed with the final product if she/he followed their directions. Hopefully, the new sewist will find you.

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    1. You are so right. This is a big concern of mine. How can we expect to inspire and keep new sewists when they are doomed to shoddy results through no fault of their own? We all know that glorious feeling of finishing a garment and all is just right with it. Nothing succeeds like success as they say.

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  6. You one thing I have noticed with some patterns is that they are putting all instructions for interfacing everything in a separate section at the beginning of the instructions. Is that possible here?

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    1. None is required on this pattern. If needed there is usually a yardage requirement on the back of the envelope, none here.

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  7. This is going to be darling! Thanks for the tip about patching on the bias, it could come in handy someday.

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  8. I hear you loud & clear, Bunny! It is a delightful looking dress & I look forward to seeing its completion. Nice save there on the skirt issue!
    It reminds me of the little quilted vest I made for Ms. C. last year. Three different fabrics, all needing batting & lining & quilting prior to construction. Oy is right!!! I was tearing my hair out over that one but she loves it & it still fits, so is getting lots of use out of it. I know Carly is going to ♥ this one!

    Hugs,
    Rett

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  9. I love your comment to the "Pattern People" you are so right. I often see ridiculous instructions or construction methods, notably on the more simple or beginner patterns. I find that the advanced, Vogue designer type pattern actually are very well done with great construction tips.
    what gives? they would be well served to focus more on the learn-to-sew patterns. I don't think they are giving up on making patterns but it is obvious, just like the chain stores they are expanding their product portfolio to make $ on all the ancillary items.

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  10. It does make you wonder if they give these patterns out to be tested, and the experience of those testing them.

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    1. They should but I am convinced they don't. I would love that job and would tell them a thing or two!

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