Sunday, September 15, 2013

The Deets on Simplicity 2153


Love this jacket!  Isn't it just perfect for a slightly cool Adirondack fall day? Here's all the deets:

Pattern:  Simplicity 2153, a basic anorak with collar and sleeve variations.I found the final results pleasing but it took a couple of muslins to get the fit right. The sleeves fit the armhole perfectly both before and after my alterations so the draft is essentially there. But the armscye area was very weird looking and until I followed my gut (you'd think I'd learn to do that right off at this point) and scooped out the front of the sleeve it just did not work. This pattern was petited, the shoulders narrowed, the sleeves shortened a lot and it had a small FBA to elminate some wrinkles. I didn't do my normal FBA as I felt the 40 /2 inches of bust was enough. The small FBA definitely helped. I also took in the side seam from the armpit to the waist a full inch on each side. So I guess that removed some of that ease. Lots of alterations but in the end I think I got it. It is a jacket and therefore will have ease and I think it is fine at this point. Just watch out for that armscye area if you make this.

I did not follow the sequence of construction in the pattern. The techniques I used required things to be done differently and needed some head time before moving from one process to the next. I did not use the epaulettes in the pattern as I thought that was too much and wanted the crinkle to be the star.

Fabric: The fashion fabric is a 100% poly crinkle. It was washed and dried before using and came out of the dryer with all wrinkles and crinkles in tact. Be careful with an iron as that can remove the wrinkles but they came back with a bit of water. The fabric is a cross woven with weft a copper-ish color and the warp a light turquoise blue. It has beautiful selvedges which I kept. When two colors are cross woven like that you get an irridescence to the fabric which is lovely. You will often see silk dupioni like this. I found this fabric in the clearance section at Joann's and got it for 2.50 a yard. I had been eying it a long time but didn't know what to make till I decided after trying on a six hundred dollar jacket in Lake Placid that a similar jacket would be just the ticket.

The lining is 100% cotton batik. It is fine and tightly woven and is easy to slip on and off over clothes. It made a great lining. It was the part of the 4 yard piece meant for Marcy Tilton's mullet dress that I decided I didn't want to make friends with.  Adhering to my oft repeated philosophy of "Just Cut It", I did, and am glad. It worked with the crinkle really well and was a delight to sew. Lets just say that was six times the cost of the crinkle.


Construction: This jacket is totally enclosed and finished on the inside. This happened by using a technique called "flat lining" which you can read about here as well as in tutes in the right sidebar. Sometimes when we don't use a technique for a while we forget how great it can be. This was just that sort of situtation. My next project will be flat lined as well. It just provides such a lovely finish.

The yoke was constructed "burrito" style which you can see here. If you've ever made a pillowcase you have probably used this method. I added a faux leather label to the facing which I painted with my initials and date, gold sharpie paint marker, not a regular marker. I love their "paint" markers. 

The sleeves used a Nancy Zieman technique which also totally finished them off and you can learn about that in the link. It is really easy. Then armscye ends up being bound with bias and nicely finished, so not a raw edge in sight on this project!

One of the fun things to do was decide how to deal with the cord going through the neckline and the waist. Did I even want to use cord? Or did I want to finger knit some sort of fiber or even use a ribbon? I found just the right color cord right when I was about to give up on the idea. Walmart to the rescue. They also had the bronze colored grommets which I couldn't find at JA's. I forget where I got the beads I used but they are cheapy "Pandora" knockoffs that I've seen in numerous craft departments. They worked great. I soaked the cord with  Fray check for about an inch and a half, put the bead on, tied the knot on the wet area and when dry cut the cord. This cord frays like an old sweater hole so be aware.
There was a lot of topstitching on this project. For the entire project I used a new size 12 Microtex needle, my go to. It worked just fine. The zip is a separating jacket zipper from Coats. I looked into ordering but felt the color of this worked perfectly. The facing is interfaced and you can see that it almost  removed the crinkle from the fabric but that was fine for the inside. Here you can see what the jacket looks like zipped up.
Well, I have worn this once already, to town to do my shopping. It feels wonderful, the way any well fitting and constructed garment does. There is just no comparison in  retail I can afford but it sure was fun trying on that six hundred dollar version! I highly recommend this pattern. Get past the arm fit and you have a winner. I am already thinking of making a denim or twill version for spring. As always, more sewing to come!.....Bunny

54 comments:

  1. This is a beauty! And it’s very very elegant on you. It’s a great Adirondack cool day jacket with lots of stylin’!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love the fabric you used and the lining is scrumptious. Did you cut the collar bigger than the pattern or did you use another collar? Your collar looks much bigger than the picture on the pattern. Great job!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's the exact collar. There is an option to run the cord a couple of inches from the edge which pulls it up and makes it look smaller. I also have a long skinny neck so that may be contributing to the look as well.

      Delete
  3. Your jacket is sensational and perfect in every way. Love the pictures of you!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Love it, you look absolutely fantastic. Amazing work on the inside, too!

    ReplyDelete
  5. fantastic and the color combo looks great on you. tres chic

    ReplyDelete
  6. Fabulous! I want one after seeing yours. Truly resourceful, too. Thanks for taking us through the construction details.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks everyone. I love finding me a bargain!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Beautiful jacket-thanks for the drawstring and fraycheck tip

    ReplyDelete
  9. Beautiful! Great fabric and looks so good on you.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I've always loved an Adirondack jacket, just hve never gotten around to making one. Yours is glamorous!

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is a master piece of an anorak! The fabric is just perfect for it!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Beautiful -- a wonderful job! Thank you so much for all the construction tips, too.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Wow! Everything you make is so professionally done. I know all the time and care you put into your garments makes you feel so, so good each time you wear them. Thanks so much for all the techniques you pass on to our sewing community. I just flat lined a linen jacket with a rayon ambiance due to your tip and it turned out great.

    Karen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so glad to hear that. Linen is a wonderful choice for flat lining with all its ravel-ry. Congrats on your new jacket!

      Delete
  14. Your jacket is perfect and you look stunning in it!! Love that necklace so majestic and the fabric is wonderful! Kisses, dear Lady.

    ReplyDelete
  15. What an absolutely stunning jacket. It looks so great on you. You have used some fabulous techniques. Do you mind if I pin them in Pinterest? I am trying to keep all techniques in one place so I know where to find them if I want to try them. Gorgeous fabrics you have used for the jacket too.

    ReplyDelete
  16. GORGEOUS!! Simply GORGEOUS...the inside is just as pretty as the outside & I swear, if you didn't want to tie the cord belt, you could get away with wearing this inside out, as well.

    I'm standing on my chair, clapping loudly for you...BRAVO!!!

    ReplyDelete
  17. It looks gorgeous, love the fabric and thanks so much for the flat lining techniques, it looks so nicely finished inside.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Bunny, your jacket is fabulous!! All your time making fitting adjustments and attention to detail really shows. I have this pattern, also and seeing your finished garment motivates me to start mine. Just, fyi, there are places on the internet to order small rivets. Anyway, I hope that others around you appreciate this jacket. Its really great.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Oh, Bunny, how fabulous!!! This may be my favorite thing that you've ever made. You look so chic and elegant. The cotton batik lining is unexpected, but I can see how it would work well. And it's a to-die-for print. Brava!!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thank you for the "just cut it " philosophy/attitude. It really helps free me in using my existing fabrics.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Wow. Case in point of how an amazing fabric can make me look at a pattern in a way I never thought I would!! This looks spectacular - I especially love the collar. There's nothing much I enjoy more than seeing close up detailed shots of the small stuff. This is one gorgeous jacket :)

    ReplyDelete
  22. Bunny, all your work is so beautiful. I love this anorak - it is so elegant, inside and out.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Gorgeous jacket, you look very chic! I also love the photography - beautiful setting. I don't comment much, but your blog, and the quality of you work, is very inspiring!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The setting is right outside my kitchen back porch. We are blessed to live in a lovely area that can be pretty wild and natural at times. I try to tame a garden into it but it's a challenge with the weather up here and the wilderness always encroaching.

      Delete
  24. Beautiful jacket!!! I love your label too...never thought of doing that. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Oh Bunny,

    As usual, totally amazing and beautiful; inspirational blog as always.

    You look absolutely fabulous and you wear the jacket so well. Good health in wearing it.
    MXX

    ReplyDelete
  26. This post and the other leading up to it are pure gold in learning new techniques and reinforcing old ones...holy moley...this is one to save for another day when I need a personal coach to get me through a jacket project! You handled the crinkle and batik masterfully and in the end I'm sure your jacket beat the RTW one hands down!Thank you for being so diligent in taking such clear photos with such precise directions...it is a joy to read and we celebrate your success yet again!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Lovely, Bunny! Your work is always beautifully done. Thanks for sharing the process with all us wanna-be's!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Really gorgeous, Bunny! And just in time for fall weather!

    ReplyDelete
  29. Just beautiful Bunny! Your construction and attention to detail is awesome!

    ReplyDelete
  30. Lovely! You always seem to find such interesting fabrics at Joann's...you must have a very discerning eye. The workmanship is superb, as always.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Your jacket is fabulous! I love every detail!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Gosh, this is such a sharp-looking jacket. It looks great, and you look splendid wearing it. Your pictures and instructions as you progressed make great tutorials, Bunny. So nice-looking!

    ReplyDelete
  33. Gosh, this is such a sharp-looking jacket. It looks great, and you look splendid wearing it. Your pictures and instructions as you progressed make great tutorials, Bunny. So nice-looking!

    ReplyDelete
  34. OMG what a stunning jacket you look like a film star in the pictures - beautiful

    ReplyDelete
  35. Beautiful jacket. I have followed all along the way in its construction. I am making the transition from quilting to garments. i used to make most of my clothes when in high school and after. The process of this jacket was intoxicating to watch. I can't wait to make one.....side note....awesome to hear that one doesn't have to drop a fortune buying fashion fabric to make a drop dead gorgeous garment!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have waiting in the wings some black cashmere for a winter coat so I do spend the big bucks now and then. But, I never pass up a bargain if it washes and dries well and looks good. In this case the look called out to me more than the price. That was just extra.

      Welcome back to garment sewing. I know so many just like you and so hope they return as you are. It is so satisfying and rewarding.

      Delete
  36. Exquisite! The design and fabric are perfect partners and your work is flawless.

    ReplyDelete
  37. It's beautiful Bunny! It was also great to read along as you constructed it. I'm sure you will get a lot of wear out of it.

    ReplyDelete
  38. TOTALLY AWESOME JACKET. I want it!!!

    ReplyDelete
  39. Absolutely gorgeous jacket from a jacket and coat lover. Yours looks like a very expensive boutique garment.

    ReplyDelete
  40. I keep going back to reread your posts about this jacket and learn something new each time. Inspired choices of materials and consummate skill in construction have created an extraordinary garment. How did you treat shoulder pads?

    ReplyDelete
  41. Miss Bunny, Once again, you have made a beautiful garment and inspired so many of us fellow sewists! Thank you for taking the time to share your wonderful skill, and for teaching us (ME!) what details to pay attention to! I'm devoted to your blog!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  42. Your jacket is absolutely stunning. I love the natural settings of the photos. Your hubby did a great job on the photography.

    ReplyDelete
  43. wowwwwwwww Im so eye stuck by your latest project. You are fab!

    ReplyDelete
  44. What a great jacket. You look fabulous.

    ReplyDelete
  45. Bunny, what did you mean when you "scooped out the front of the sleeve..."? I can't picture the procedure.
    Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Late answer here: I took my french curve and placed it on the front of the sleeve pattern and curved it into the sleeve head about a third of an inch at its zenith and tapering to nothing about an inch short of the shoulder seam and about an inch and a half from the underarm seam. A matching amount was taken out of the bodice.

      Delete

Engaging commentary: