Sunday, November 2, 2014

Butterick 5387

The rayon top is done and got some good feedback. I will get right into the details.


Pattern:  

The pattern is Butterick 5387 and I have made it before. If you check PR, you will see that there are many who had issues with the collar band and center front opening. I did too but it made much more sense this time than the first time I made it. While I did it a bit differently, only because it is hard to understand the drawing and directions, I managed to get the necessary final effect on the band. 

One thing about this pattern to pay attention to: this is in direct relation to our NLS post #4 about patterns. If you look at the front of the pattern there are four views.  Only view A has what appears to be a center front seam. The other views show the front seam definitely moved to  the side of the bodice, looking like it's running right over the apex of the bust. Not...the only difference between views is the sleeve style. No view has a pattern piece making the seam left or right of center front. When I originally bought this pattern I was specifically looking for the assymetrical front. It doesn't exist. Beware!  Also, my pattern has two tops with the pleats on the left and two with the pleats on the right. It looks like Butterick has since corrected that. 



I used a size 6 with an FBA, basically the cheater knit one where you add more length to the bust by rounding out in the side seam on the front and adding a bit of length too. 

The pattern could be MUCH clearer in it's explanation of bringing the pleats  around the band. Steps 18 and 19 make you go huh?????? But somehow I got it to work but I ended up with the  seam of that whole debacle not being hidden. So I trimmed it, catchstitched to the band, and it works and looks just fine. This one is a real handholder, if you know someone. 


 

Fabric: 

True confessions time. This was in the Joanns clearance sale. It's a Rayon, lycra blend and while it wasn't passionate love, I felt it would mimic the blouse I saw in a Mary Ray post on the Threads website. So for a few dollars I gave it a whirl. The pleating and tucking are irregular and random.

It is very thin so undies and my dressform react to the camera and show through, much more so than in real life. In my pics I have on a nude cami which helps. Think tissue paper with pleat texturing and you've got this fabric. It stretches bigtime and this is a snug pattern but I am comfortable with that look in this one. Part of that is because of the godets.

The tricot fusible I used to line the hem shows through from the flash as well but really not at all in real life. I love that stuff. It is found in the quilt department of JAs and called quilt seaming tape. It is the exact same stuff that is sold for the big bucks on line as fusible tricot stay tape. It makes a great knit hem. I iron it on, turn up a knit hem and either topstitch or catchstitch.



Construction:

This was like herding cats to sew. I helped that situation by starching and ironing each seam before sewing. If I did it again I would do a "jello blouse" to quote someone more clever than myself. That is the technique where you soak your flimsy thin fabric in gelatin to give it stiffness and it works really well.

What veered from the pattern were the band issues already mentioned, the fused hem, and my addition of the the godets in the side seam.

This was simple and easy. I left open the side seam about nine inches, from the waist level to the hem. I then cut strips of the fabric 11 x 22 inches wide. That gave me enough length to run the strip from hem up  to the closed side seam and down to the other hem. I stitched it in easily. Then I opened the whole thing out flat and trimmed the godet hem so that it was circular and both equal. Starch and hem and we were done! As one of my friends said. it gives me some "swish" and she liked that idea. I just liked the idea of jazzing up a pretty simple design.

Would I recommend this? With reservations. This would not be a beginner pattern due to the neck band difficulties, IMO. But I think if you power through you have a nice top and I do promise the second one will be easier, maybe not made the way the pattern says, but easier. If it's your first effort get a more forgiving type of fabric. An ITY knit would be perfect and I may make another. I do like this pattern..........Bunny





13 comments:

  1. Your top is beautiful! Kudos to you for figuring out techniques to make it work. Your version is so much nicer than the pattern sketches.

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  2. I love this top on you. The fabric sounds like a pita to sew but you made it work. I think that anyone not experienced with knits would have ended up with a wadder instead you've got a terrific top.

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  3. What a lovely top and a beautiful great wheel too!

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  4. Thanks, ladies. Ariana, that spinning wheel was a gift from my hubby many years ago, one of the best!

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  5. Pretty top, Bunny. You'll be surprised by some of the fabrics you find in the JoAnn's clearance section.

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    1. I know. I've gotten some great dupionis back there and other sorts of surprises. Glad you like the top.

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  6. Lovely, lovely top. I was intrigued by the random seams too and marked it for future reference. Your top is an inspiration, as so often.

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  7. Effectively you've turned a pigs ear into a silk purse. Who says that can't be done! Love the random pleating.

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  8. Loved seeing this version of the pattern. I've made it twice with two very different results. First was some highly textured poly knit without any rolling at the cut edge. While there was a lot of hand sewing along the inside of the neck edge, it was a success. The second version was an epic fail. It was done in a wonderful Marcy Tilton cotton knit, but turning facings was a terrific mess with the fabric fighting me at every turn. I haven't had the heart to toss it or wear it. It's still a very cool design, in spite of the challenges and yours is wonderful

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    1. I can see how a fabric that does not take a sharp press would make that neck band really difficult. Next time saturate the seam edges with starch and iron them that way. It should help a bit.

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  9. It looks fabulous on you...... well done!

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  10. Thanks for a great post today. I am really interested in finding the fusible tricot for stabilizing seams and hems. While I was in two fabric stores today, neither one were able to point me to a tricot (knit) fusible interfacing - and one of them is the JA to which you referred. Do you have any recommendations on specific brands? Does it come pre-cut for seams, etc or does it come in wider widths like fabric?

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