Sunday, March 6, 2016

Another save! Vogue 9169, adding a godet

I am the first to admit that I have ample hips. But you can see an issue on my mannequin who is made to my exact measurements. The underlay sections does not meet the overlay section of this tee pattern, Vogue 9169.  I flat pattern measured and there was ease but I am thinking maybe I did something wrong in that process. I did match notches, etc. In the end, there is just not enough room for my booty. What's a sewist to do? I had some stripe fabric left. BTW  the stripe fabric was a maxi skirt from the thrift shop for 25 cents. Let me tell you, there is a lot of yardage in last summer's maxis and they abound at our local thrift, a great source for fabrics.

After a bit of thought, I figured adding a godet would be the solution. However, the underlay was complete with side seam sewn and the hems in and double topstitched. I was not taking that hem out of a thin knit, either. Here is what I did to add the godet to the the underlay. 

 I cut a section, an arbitrary 10 inches wide, on grain. The sides of the underlay are curved at the hip. I took my hip curve ruler and curved the bottom of the godet. This makes it lay, more or less, at the same level as the finished hem. I don't know any math equation to do this. I just curved it up about an inch higher at the sides than the center. The hem was lined with fusible tricot, slashed to accommodate the curve and pressed up the same width as the hem on the underlay. 

Next, the godet was folded in half, all edges  matching. I used the hip ruler to cut a curve mimicking the side seam of the underlay. The top of the godet would be at my natural waist. 

Right sides together, the godet is pinned to the side seam of the underlay. I simply cut off the original side seam of the underlay to eliminate the stitching. The hem is folded out and the folds of the two hems match. I then sewn from the fold of the hem, not the edge, and up to 5/8ths inch away from the top of the godet. You want the point of the  godet to be free so stop 5/8ths inch short, like you see below.


Once that is pressed  (It will be trimmed after),  it is time to match up the other side of the godet. Simply pin the whole length of the underlay. You will sew from the bottom hem fold, again open, to that same point where you ended on the first side, 5/8th inch short of the end of the godet. 


Then stop,cut your threads, flip that end point of the godet out of the way. Go back under the presser foot and start sewing again from that point to the end of the underlay. This will leave the point free. Check the front and see if any correction needs to be made to have a smooth transition at the point and a tightly sewn point. You can maybe see that my seams are a "wobble" seam, two rows,  stitched a quarter of an inch apart. This was then trimmed back to the second stitch. The "wobble" stitch, an Nancy Zieman term, is a very very narrow zigzag which provides the needed stretch. It works great. Why not used the serger? For one, it's not necessary as this fabric will never ravel. Plus it can show bulk when pressed. Just my choice but many sew all their knits with the serger. That's fine, not critique there. Plus, maneuvering that point could get a little tricky with the knife! 

The hem is now folded into place and the top stitching sewn, match that on the original underlay. Now I can connect it to the overlay section, whew! Now it fits! 

**************************************

Winter just won't let its grip on us go. This icicles, curving into the house remind me of it's icy tentacles and the way we all feel after the nasty month of February. Please Spring, come!....bunny

16 comments:

  1. This is a genius save. Interestingly, this treatment is very strong in ready to wear by top designers now too. See, you are ahead of the curve without even trying.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Bunny, I do not envy you the growing icicles but around here, we are hoping for a reprieve on our warmer than usual weather as we know, all too well, what comes after Spring - a very hot and sometimes earlier than normal Summer. I will trade you an icicle or two for some low 90s in early March.
    Theresa in Tucson

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wonderful save on this top. The godet, with its stripes going at a different angle, adds an interesting detail. Those are scary looking icicles.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'll wear it to work tomorrow and we'll see what my friend's reactions are. They are pretty honest. thanks, Audrey.

      Delete
  4. Great save, I love the strip with the pattern. I hope it warms up for you soon, we have warmer than usual weather here in Colorado.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Good save, but I do not believe you have "ample hips." Pattern companies are always making things to an imaginary figure. Someone estimated that 60 percent of women are pear shaped,so WHY are things made for pouter pigeons?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And pouter pigeons with B cup bras! Most women wear a C cup from what I've read.

      My hips are ample in comparison to my waist so there are wicked adjustments. Frankly, that's what got me sewing way back in my teens. My waist to hip ration was just off the charts at that time. If only it was now!

      Delete
  6. Sometimes our biggest blunders yield the most wonderful results...I'd say this is one of those times for you! I love your new godet. Thanks for letting us see the process. Linda S.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love your fix. Maybe the fabric stretched longer and narrower as it was somewhat bias grain but that doesn't account for the amount that needed to be added. Bad pattern drafting? Great and creative solution!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Such a clever and stylish save. Love it. You are so creative!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I love it when a save turns out even half as good as yours. Brilliant job Bunny!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I love godets!!!! And now one with stripes next to other stripes...genius, Bunny! You are just so darn creative with all your clothes! Such a treat to read your blog.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Thanks, everyone. I hope do get some pics up this weekend.

    ReplyDelete

Engaging commentary: