Monday, February 6, 2017

Trimming Fur




My plan for getting the bathroom remodel done and the bag done at the same time got flummoxed a bit this weekend. Bathroom day found me with some fast moving, just short of violent sort of stomach virus. With the mess in that room, my sewing day had to become the bathroom remodel day on Sunday. ALL wallpaper is now finally down. What a chore and I will never wallpaper again! Next weekend will have me doing a TSP wash and then mudding the walls where needed. That will need to dry well so the weekend after it will be paint. Then I will start on the cabinets. We are still not finding the perfect lights but that is more a logistical issue with our cabinets. We'll find them! 

The good news is I feel great now and did get a bit of sewing in this morning before work. I decided on a fur flap instead of the suede and thought you might want to see how I trimmed the seam allowances. 

Once the fur piece is cut out it's flipped to the right side and the fur is brushed to the side, exposing the edge of the seam allowance. 

Then I put a little pressure on the piece and roll it away from the table so the edge of the seam allowance is facing you, sort of standing up. 




With the seam standing up, just slip the points of your shears about a 1/4 inch down and start snipping and sliding down. It goes quite quickly. Cut a few inches. Rub off the cut fur and put it in the trash then snip some more. 




Here you can see the shaved seam allowance, ready to stitch! I find it's good to be a bit conservative with the cutting. The shaved area always seems bigger than what you think you're cutting.

I hope this bit of a hint  helps someone out there. It works a lot better than trying to cut fur out out of the backing with everything laid out flat. Hopefully next time we talk the bag will be close to done.........Bunny

5 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thanks, Faye. I know you are a great coat maker. Maybe a fur one is in your future?

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  2. This is a great tip. Sometimes working with different fabrics can be a challenge. I have saved this to my Fabric Pinterest board.

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    Replies
    1. Glad you like it and thanks for the reminder. I will add it to my board too.

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  3. The beauty of working with fake fur is that it stays in your room and machine for a very long time no matter how much you vacuum. I was thinking that holding the fur flat with masking tape where your fingers are and then when you cut it, it stays on the tape? Anything to keep that fluff from flying! Happy to hear you are feeling better, Bunny!

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