Sewing Vloggers

Wednesday, December 29, 2021

One of My Favorites

 


Doesn't everyone have a favorite sweater, one that is so very soft and ever so cuddly warm?  This is mine. It is 100% cashmere and made by Herman Geist. I love anything Herman Geist. I don't think I own anything that is as soft and lovely feeling as this very mundane gray sweater. I have had it for quite a few years and don't want to give it up. Unfortunately it was starting to fall apart. The hip and sleeve seams were coming unsewn  and that was a very easy fix. 


The neckline, however, was in tatters in some spots and needed to be fixed somehow. I am not a knitter. I do embroider. I do have scads of woolen embroidery yarns in every color imaginable. What to do , what to do?  

I took some pieces of wool that I had hand dyed back when and made little circles to hide the tatters. I then just pretty much threaded my needle and started stitching away. It has been a long time since I have done this type of work so what you see is pretty sorry but I think it will work for now and give me some more time with my beloved sweater. 




Being big on balance but not wanting to bring too too much attention to my wide hips, I did a more subtle version of the design down on the opposite hip.  I think it works. 


While I don't expect it to bring me any prizes at the county fair,  I think Ole' Herman would approve of my changes to his rather blah but wonderful gray sweater. Even if I just wear it around the house and it makes me smile and feel warm and softness all around me, that's a good thing. Nothing better on a cold, snowy day like today..............Bunny

25 comments:

  1. How perfectly charming!
    I hesitate to repair a loved and hole-y sweater because it will alter the look . . . of a sweater with holes in it.
    Doh! Any repair will look better.
    Happy new year!
    Barbara

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  2. I love your repair. it looks original!

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  3. This is lovely! I am just beginning to dip into the visible mending waters. This inspires me!

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    1. Thanks. For some serious inspiration look up Flora Collingwood-Norris. She will definitely inspire.

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  4. What a wonderful 'save'. A definite up-cycle.

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  5. Awesome save! I see nothing sorry about your work. And I like how those lines of backstitch(?) tie the patches into the rest of the sweater.

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  6. A beautiful save. Where do you get your mending yarns?
    Vancouver Barbara

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    1. A fellow blogger, who stopped blogging over ten years ago or more, lives not far away here in New Hampshire. If I remember properly, someone she knew who owned a yarn or embroidery shop was closing her business and gave her a lot of the contents. She kept all the yarns as she is an avid knitter and was at that time an avid sewist as well, alas no more. She contacted me and asked me if I'd be interested in the Paternayan woolen yarn collection. These are used in crewel work and needlepoint for the most part. I was overjoyed to say yes and she sent her amazing gift along its way. I have used them often over the years and think of her generous gift every time I do. They are perfect for mending on sweaters and using in my speedweave. Once in a while she reads the blog so Hi, S., if you are out there and thank you once again if you are reading. You touched many with your sewing, blogging and generosity.

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  7. Great Save! It is beautiful and reminds me of my $1200 appliquéd Valentino sweater that I recently rescued from the thrift store for $13. That was a good save also..ha! I am really impressed with the efforts to re-cycle items I am seeing among sewists. But then our moms always did say quality beats out quantity. Beautiful work Bunny and thanks for the inspiration!

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    1. Wow! That sweater sounds wonderful and thanks for your comments.

      I have hoped that our younger generation would come around to realizing that spending on a quality garment is so worth saving for and that goes for good fabric as well. It lasts longer, really gives more joy, and is worth keeping looking good and extending its wearing life. When I visit these mending and upcycling groups on FB I see that taking hold. A realization of the value of quality clothing and that less is sometimes more is starting settle in with the motivator being the impact all of this fast fashion is having on the planet. I read something startling the other day because it rang so true with my own experience. When I was small both my Mom and my grandmother were very well dressed women. There closets were pretty much empty but when I think of a couple of the dresses I remember them wearing for church or such, they were beautiful fabrics, beautifully made and worn over and over. They made most of them. There were not a lot in the closet. We can really impact the environmental issues we are facing ahead with that sort of mind set. Thank you for your comments, Yvonne.

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  8. I have a number of cashmere sweaters that the moths have gotten to and I am needle felting designs over them. I have also seen a gadget that helps you weave a patch right into the sweater. Will look for that and advise you but your patches are very lovely.

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    1. Thank you. That gadget is probably a "Speedweave" which I just used and wrote about in a post. Click on "older posts" and you will see it come up and my experience. You will see my first patch, which is pretty obviously inexperienced but I have learned a lot since then. There are many many videos on youtube but this is the one that got me on the right path, clearly. https://youtu.be/DOmm8HL5fwY

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    2. Also want to add that I saw on etsy, transfers for moth eaten holes that you then embroider over. Wish I could remember the brilliant person marketing those!

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  9. I agree that "visible mending" can look beautiful. A great job as usual, Bunny. I have done similar mending in my jeans using a Japanese Boro style and I like the outcome as well. D.

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    1. I look forward to making a boro style jacket soon. I need to dye the fabric first. I think the pits of February will be just the time to start.

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    2. I love jeans that have the boro style. You have surely extended their life a great deal.

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  10. Bunny, what a wonderful extended life to your sweater! I am envisioning some projects when I return home. Something with my favorite skinny cut jeans!

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    1. Visible mending gives a whole new meaning to the concept of the mending basket! Thank you for your lovely comment.

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  11. Beautiful, balanced, original…much better than the plain gray sweater it once was. IMHO.

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  12. What a great idea! I have some cashmere sweaters that either have a worn elbow or just don't fit anymore, unfortunately, that I intend to cut up into squares and sew back together to make a wearable sweater. It's nice to same a love sweater.

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