Monday, September 29, 2014

The Ikat Jacket, Simp 2153, again!


This really is meant to be a lightweight summer jacket but Mother Nature and my constant recent delays made for some Autumnal modeling shots today. I really like  this jacket and will get a lot of use out of it. Our summers are generally in the fifties at night so a lightweight jacket is a must. Factor in a lot of jeans wear and I think this will become a staple in the closet. Here's the 411:

Pattern: 
This is Simplicity 2153. It is the same jacket I used for the Threads Fall Jacket Challenge last year. A good anorak pattern is a great thing to have in the stash and this may not be the last time I make this. I can see me making it in some rainwear as well.

The pattern itself is fairly easy but I made quite a few changes and because of those changes did not follow the sequence in the pattern. More on that..........

Fabric:
This is 100% cotton home dec fabric, maybe, just maybe from Fabric.com. I do know the selvedge says it is a Raymond Waites design called "Tincia" (?), can't tell. It's hard to read. It also says it was made for Mill Creek Fabrics. I love the texture. It is like a heavy textured linen which you can see better here.

I prewashed this fabric removing the "soil and stain repellant finish" listed on the selvedge but it got a really nice soft hand to work with after that, more like clothing. I love to sew with home dec fabrics. I can't remember one, even tapestries, that I didn't throw in the washer and dryer. It softens them up and makes them much more wearable and sewable. Don't hesitate to look at home dec fabrics next time you are shopping. 

The lining is rayon Bemberg lining. Interfacing is a woven from Fashion Sewing Supply. Have to get more of their product as I am close to out!

Construction:

I made quite a few changes. The pattern does not specify a lining. I did a bound lining (formerly named flat lining) that you can see how to do here. It gives a really nice finish to a more casual garment like this. This fabric was quite ravelly and I am glad the seam edges were bound from the beginning.  The bodice pieces were all flat lined before starting construction. The sleeves were lined using the Nancy Zieman method which can be found in the tutorials. The armscye edges were bound with Bemberg lining. 

This pattern does not have a facing that goes around the neckline. I made one and much prefer how that finished up with the bound edges compared to a partical facing and lining run up to the neckline. I've never been a fan of that technique. 

I dropped the casing down a half inch as I felt it was a touch too high in the first iteration. 

Pockets were cut on the bias simply to add a bit of interest and to help the fabric move away from the home dec vibe. The hip pockets were cut at a slant with cuff. Rivets were used to secure the pocket corners and were intentionally put in upside down as I liked the back of the rivets better than the front. Pockets were topstitched with a triple stitch. 

I used simple drapery cord for the cording which I may change if I find something better. I am not 100% happy with that and am still looking. There is a pony bead at the end of each cord, simple, and cord locks at the waistline . 

I added two inches to the length which I find kind of interesting as I am only five feet tall. So watch the length if you make this. I faced the hem instead of folding it up. 

Split cuffs were added to the sleeves with a deep facing. The sleeves on this run huge. I took a good inch out of the width. Usually I am adding width to accommodate those late in life accumulations under my arms but this pattern actually had to be made smaller, so beware. 

It took extra effort and fabric at the cutting stage to insure that all the prints matched and were symmetrical throughout. 



Conclusion:

I am pleased with the pattern, once again, and the outcome. I love Ikat designs and this project let me express that choice. I highly recommend the pattern but suggest lining it one method or another and making a full facing that goes around the neckline. If I find the right rainwear fabric I may give this a go one more time!


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I've had some questions regarding the iron I just purchased. I used it throughout this project and knocked down my ironing pile today as well. I am very pleased with it. It pushes out more steam than any iron I have ever had,no drips. It is a Rowenta "Steamforce" which I got through Amazon. My favorite feature, however, is that skinny little point with the steam holes in it. It is wonderful for ironing seams open effortlessly. No burned fingers! And those are all steam holes, not dimples, unlike my last Rowenta. 

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I often get asked about my little bunny labels. I picked up this roll, half of which has been given away, quite some time ago. I got it at the much missed "Fabric Fix" store for one dollar for the entire roll. I would love to think that one day I will actual run out of little bunny labels. Now that's a sewing fantasy!...................Bunny

42 comments:

  1. Love the jacket! I'm an ikat fan, too. I don't know about your area, but it's been like summer around here both last week and this week! The leaves are changing and falling... and the kids are wearing shorts and t-shirts!?!?

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    1. It has been an incredible Indian Summer for the last couple weeks, hitting 80 every day and blues skies continuously. I just came back from a wonderful walk with the glorious fall leaves flitting all around me. It's been great.

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  2. I had forgotten all about the jacket you made last year that I loved so much. This one is gorgeous too.

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    1. Thanks Faye. Just want to say I have been loving your comments on Project Runway, great fun.

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    2. Alright Bunny, you made me stress a little bit about this pattern. Now that my pattern collection resides in three locations in my house I wasn't absolutely sure that I had the pattern. Knew I should have, but wasn't sure. Went to the fabric store today and almost paid $11.00 for it but just couldn't convince myself to do that. I came home and checked one of my pattern boxes and there it was, so glad I save that $11. Now I've just got to find just the right fabric for the project.

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  3. Your jacket turned out beautifully. It's such a great use of home-dec Ikat. I'm glad to learn I'm not the only one who likes to pre-wash heavier fabrics, even tapestries. I was shopping for some cotton upholstery velvet (without that rubbery backing) once, and when I told the sales lady I needed extra so I could pre-wash it, I thought she was going to have a stroke. She never did agree that I could use it for a bedspread or coverlet, and she only begrudgingly sold it to me.

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    1. I inherited some gorgeous silk velvet upholstery fabric. I threw it in the washer and dryer and it came out so soft and usable. You may have inspired me to take another look at it.

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    2. I love the jacket and love anything ikat. Bunny you make a simple lightweight jacket look like a couture garment. I can't wait for your sewing series. I know we will all learn something and be reminded of things we have forgotten. I also love vintage sewing books. I will have to dig out my favorite and take some pictures.

      I love to see what happens when you wash heavy home dec fabric. I made costumes for years and for most of my Shakespeare costumes I would use heavy home dec brocades. The fabric store I used had really knowledgeable women and they actually suggested it first when I was looking for something resembling the heavy brocades but not quite so heavy. They were all from Cuba and there is a lot of sewing going on in that community. There was nothing more fun than opening the dryer after a good wash and dry and seeing what the result was - which color would puff out and which would change texture. Especially for the stage in a theater the texture was fantastic.

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  4. I've enjoyed watching this jacket come to life. Ikat print is a favourite of mine.

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  5. I was about to comment on the rabbit too!! So cute. The jacket is great!

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  6. It's so exciting to see the finished jacket. Thanks for sharing, it looks great!

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  7. I love the placement of the ikat fabric on the back yoke and collar. Perfect.

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  8. Wow, so beautiful and so current. Love all your details and explanations.

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  9. Stunning jacket, your eye for fabric choice, pattern and styling is superb! Well done ... J

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  10. Love everything about your jacket, Bunny. Your meticulous attention to detail is inspiring. I'll be making my own version soon -- with you beside me every step of the way. Thanks for all that you share with us!

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  11. Beautiful, love the fabric and it's a great tip to check the upholstry fabric as I often overlook then.

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  12. Your jacket turned out perfect - both inside and outside!!! Not that I expected anything different. LOL! Great use of the home dec fabric. :D

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  13. That is really, REALLY cool looking, Bunny! LOVE the pattern on the back & how you made the back yoke go in a different direction & centered that "X" perfectly. You always think of everything & I so admire your meticulous attention to detail. Great job!!

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  14. What a great jacket, it suits you so well. Beautiful work (as always).

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  15. It's so beautiful, which is even more wonderful because it is intended as a utilitarian piece of clothing. I'm just starting to use flat lining. I've used it to line the sleeves of m last two unlined jacket projects. I'm always stumped at the armhole finishes though. I've usually just serger the armhole edges. Did you bind the edges on this project?

    Your projects inspire.

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    1. Yes. The sleeves are bound with bias strips of the lining fabric. First pass is stitched by machine, second pass by hand.

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  16. I'm new to fashion sewing, can you tell me what "IKAT" means, LOL! I love your blog, great info and it really illustrates all the possibilities available to someone who can sew.

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    1. According to wiki: "Ikat, or Ikkat, is a dyeing technique used to pattern textiles that employs a resist dyeing process on the warp fibres, the weft fibres, or in the rare and costly 'double ikat' both warp and weft, prior to dyeing and weaving." That doesn't really tell you much. It is a technique of weaving that gives you often diamond shapes in various forms. The threads are dyed and woven in a way that makes sort of a "blurry geometric" look, my description. I love the blurred look and the usually two colors used. If you google images for Ikat it will give you pictures that will explain far better than my words. It is a definite "look" and pattern.

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  17. Your jacket is very nice! Have you thought about a 2-way zipper for the next version? I love them in coats and jackets longer than upper-hip length - it's so much nicer for driving. Or adjusting for more ventilation. And saving stress on the zipper and stitching.

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    1. I did regret not doing a two way once I started wearing the jacket. I will definitely do that next time.

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  18. Stunning work. Your attention to detail is so inspiring!

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  19. Hi Bunny,
    So thrilled to see the completed jacket, absolutely beautifully made as always. Adore the choice of fabric, the colour really, really suits you.

    DH and I have taken to daily walks in the countryside around our home and now the weather is turning I am constantly complaining about not having a suitable jacket.............I seem to always be adverse to getting "casual" jackets and I think I really must address this element of my wardrobe. I should dip my toe in the water, buy this pattern and go fabric hunting. If I can make it half as good as yours I would be pleased. My list of projects is getting longer not shorter!
    Thanks for sharing your expertise.

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    1. Make sure you check out the home dec fabrics, Marysia.

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  20. Beautiful jacket! Love the colors - they remind me of a sunny day. You look great!

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  21. Oooh, I love your jacket! You've got me excited about my next project...I'm about to begin a jacket, and it too, will be made from home dec fabric. I've used home decor fabric for clothing before, and, like you, love the results! It's my first visit here, and I love your bunny labels!!!

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    1. Welcome to the blog. It's great to have you visit. I hope you get to check out the other pages listed right below the masthead.

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  22. Absolutely gorgeous, Bunny! I don't know just WHAT it is going to take for me to FINALLY break out this pattern!!! Some of my favorite makes from you and Margy use this pattern!!!!

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    1. Maybe add some asymmetry? crazy pockets? I know you'll think of something.

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  23. Thanks for showing us some lovely work. You inspired me to use this pattern for a vest which is unlined - too hot for this climate.. Would you recommend a back neck facing with an unlined garment also?

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  24. I would. Otherwise you will have the front facings ending in the middle of the yoke on your vest, not that great a finish, IMO. Good luck!

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  25. Another great version of this jacket. I wouldn't have thought to use a large pattern for this pattern, but it really is beautiful and one of a kind. Lovely shade of blue!

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  26. I love it! I think the fabric choice and all the little details are what set it off.

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  27. wowser! what a stunning jacket! Nice work all 'round.

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